SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: psd to html

  1. #1
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Post psd to html

    Is there any easy way to convert PSD to HTMl? If any other software does the same work please let me know because Dreamweaver
    takes too many time.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Addict JerXs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wilkes-Barre, PA
    Posts
    347
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here is a good tutorial for a PS to DW site, gives all the basics. Its a good place to start. If you are just starting out Colin the owner of the Photoshop cafe also published a book Photoshop & Dreamweaver Intergration which is also very helpfull.

    This is where I got my start a few years back.

    http://photoshopcafe.com/tutorials/s...02/website.htm

    GL Jer

  3. #3
    SitePoint Enthusiast Darren Hoyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    55
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I haven't used Fireworks in a couple years, but I know they used to have a system of guides you could arrange to create "slices" which were then exported as HTML. Unfortunately, the markup was terrible and full of pixel shims.

    Personally, I think you're best bet is to do it all manually. Create your mockup in Photoshop, arrange the guides according to how you'll slice up your layout and then export each image manually. Then in a text editor, hand-code your markup and drop in the images (or divs with image backgrounds) where needed. Seems like more work, but well worth it.

  4. #4
    SitePoint Addict JerXs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wilkes-Barre, PA
    Posts
    347
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personally, I think you're best bet is to do it all manually. Create your mockup in Photoshop, arrange the guides according to how you'll slice up your layout and then export each image manually. Then in a text editor, hand-code your markup and drop in the images (or divs with image backgrounds) where needed. Seems like more work, but well worth it.
    Agree totally, but we all need to start somewhere. When I first started I new squat, I started learning by playing with the code that Image Ready/ Photoshop spit out. Saying hey just slice up your mock up and code it in HTML / XHTML and CSS is not that easy to someone that doesnt know either.

    I am assuming you dont know HTML/XHTML or CSS.

    Good advice though. I remember people giving me the same advice and without it I would probably still be at square one, not that I am to to far away from that point now.



    This is also another good link for learning http://www.w3schools.com/

  5. #5
    SitePoint Zealot DewChugr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like to use Imageready to draw the slices, name them then select the slices I created and save optimized only the selected slices. This saves times exporting each one individually. But don't let Imageready do the code.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm all for doing it manually...ImageReady or Photoshop may not give you exactly what you want in terms of how it writes code, so you'd just end up going back to fix it, anyway. And what's great about Dreamweaver is that it has a lot of power, and isn't hard to use once you learn, which isn't difficult, as well. (Sorry if I don't have a lot of sympathy in this area...there were only one or two WYSIWYG programs when I was starting out, so I had to hand-code! )

    However, I will agree with most of my comrades that trying to code anything with HTML and CSS, unless you know the languages, would be a mistake. Especially CSS...even as an experienced designer, I tend to go against the "standard" of using it for layout, since it can be very hard to position things, especially if you are designing for different screen resolutions.
    Terri Eades - Web/Graphic Designer - www.terrieades.com

  7. #7
    Non-Member Egor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Perfectionist121
    Especially CSS...even as an experienced designer, I tend to go against the "standard" of using it for layout, since it can be very hard to position things, especially if you are designing for different screen resolutions.
    To me, and the majority of people here I think, that sounds like you need to polish up on your skills. CSS offers a lot more options for positioning, including replication of the typical <table> behaviour.

  8. #8
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Egor
    To me, and the majority of people here I think, that sounds like you need to polish up on your skills. CSS offers a lot more options for positioning, including replication of the typical <table> behaviour.
    Maybe so. I just know using div layer positioning was very tedious and after hours, would still not give me what I wanted. But it's been awhile since I dove into that kind of CSS, as well.
    Terri Eades - Web/Graphic Designer - www.terrieades.com


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •