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  1. #26
    SitePoint Addict Troy1960's Avatar
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    You sound like you could be the boss from Office Space.
    Gunwallet.com- Digitally backup vital gun information.

  2. #27
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    molona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by basia
    Half year would pass away and the most important is not to be forced to visit psychiatrist afterwards.

  3. #28
    SitePoint Wizard Wolf_22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy1960
    You sound like you could be the boss from Office Space.
    I don't really think I sound like that.

  4. #29
    SitePoint Member leontech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf_22
    I've had some of my team members complain about how my office door is usually shut, and I've had others complain about how they don't have the keys to their office doors. I've told them that the reason I've committed to both is due in part of:

    1.) Anti-theft
    2.) Operational Integrity
    3.) Communicational Awareness/Retention
    4.) Simply because "I said so".
    4) is definitely a no-no. Using status to push down order works in military but not in IT industry. What is the real reason of not giving key to their office doors? If you have spare key everything should be fine.

    My question is this:
    Is there a way to get on them (verbal warning?) without feeling like I might be making a mistake? Personally, I know close to nothing about networking, and I know very little about server-rights administration. SO, how am I supposed to get on one of them for not getting a project completed if I'm not sure that it's really them to begin with (because we all know about the halo affect: they always work when I'm over there supervising them...)? They always tell me that they know how to do it...
    Having a person who can maps out different modules of the project for you, then assign each of the smaller tasks to individual person and make them accountable on those tasks. Then you will know who is slipping the project schedule, and who's not. The key point is to have clear responsibilities and make them accountable to the outcome.

  5. #30
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    Hi Wolf,

    I was in a similar situation just over a year ago. It's a very tricky balancing act. Might I recommend that you look at www.manager-tools.com. The podcasts are fantastic and have really helped me get on top of issues like this without destroying the relationships.

    You might want to listed to the "Giving Feedback" podcast. The method works incredibly well for good and "correcting" feedback and you might find it useful in your situation.

    All the best.
    Af.

  6. #31
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    molona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf_22
    I don't really think I sound like that.
    I don't know if to congratulate you for being so confident or tell you that one thing is how you see yourself and something very different how others see you.

    It is true that we will hardly know you and that our opinion is not really important since we cannot see the full picture. You may have very good reasons to do what you do. But, for what I read in this thread, there is something about you that I don't really like... wouldn't be able to point out what it is though, you seem nice enough.

  7. #32
    SitePoint Wizard Wolf_22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leontech
    4) is definitely a no-no...
    I disagree. I agree to the fact that you shouldn't abuse this, but I also agree that sometimes it's needed. I've more than explained myself to my team. I've let them go home early a couple times last week to allow them "fruit for their labor", and so far we're doing great (vs. when this summer term started).

    Managing can be a hard thing, but it can also be a great thing. There are those amongst us who excel at it, while others suffer. I feel as if I'm one who does a bit of both (especially since I've tackled "extra-departmental affairs").

    The good news is that things are rolling! We've now been able to come up with a semi-standard for weekly output. We're kicking butt on the web-end of things, and we now have air conditioning! WOOT! Ha!

    SO, despite the fact that everything was going pretty rough when I first took the helm, everything is going great now. Someone said that he/she felt as if I was going through some sort of chemical learning earlier on here. Well, I think thats what it was.

    I appreciate all your advice and feedback people. You guys/gals are really awesome!

  8. #33
    SitePoint Wizard Wolf_22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by molona
    I don't know if to congratulate you for being so confident or tell you that one thing is how you see yourself and something very different how others see you.

    It is true that we will hardly know you and that our opinion is not really important since we cannot see the full picture. You may have very good reasons to do what you do. But, for what I read in this thread, there is something about you that I don't really like... wouldn't be able to point out what it is though, you seem nice enough.
    Wow. I think thats the first time I've ever made a complete stranger have an issue/state a negative opinion of me over the internet.

    I'm sorry about making you feel unstable about my own integrity. I still feel however that I'm doing a great job and that I don't pass out too many "TPS Reports".

  9. #34
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    molona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf_22
    Wow. I think thats the first time I've ever made a complete stranger have an issue/state a negative opinion of me over the internet.

    I'm sorry about making you feel unstable about my own integrity. I still feel however that I'm doing a great job and that I don't pass out too many "TPS Reports".
    Well, I don't think is an issue and it is not a negative opinion. It is just a mere observation but I may have completely misunderstood the whole thing as English is not my native language.

    When you opened the thread, I've got the impression that you were a bit nervous about the task that laid ahead, and that there were major issues (like thefts, work not getting done and, which is even more dangerous, not knowing exactly what is the reason, the interns, or your lack of knowledge in certain fields...) that you weren't sure how to handle.

    But then, as people answered your request for counsel, you answered as if your team was great, the job was getting done, what you and your team accomplished, and that you didn't see the point to change your views.

    And again, you point out several reasons to explain why things didn't happen as you wished (like that you moved recently from one office to another, changes in the company structure, etc).

    Sometimes you sound like if you knew what to do and that this thread is not much use to you, and sometimes you sound like if you don't know what to do next (which is the normal thing for a first-time manager ).

    When someone gives you general advice, you are OK, but if it is something specific, then you look like a bit defensive and try to justify yourself.

    Something is just not right.

  10. #35
    SitePoint Wizard Wolf_22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by molona
    Well, I don't think is an issue and it is not a negative opinion. It is just a mere observation but I may have completely misunderstood the whole thing as English is not my native language.
    First of all, let me apologize for I feel that either you or myself may have been confused somewhere along the lines of this thread. Maybe it's your comprehension of the English language or maybe it's my own convention of it. Definately food for thought.

    Quote Originally Posted by molona
    When you opened the thread, I've got the impression that you were a bit nervous about the task that laid ahead, and that there were major issues (like thefts, work not getting done and, which is even more dangerous, not knowing exactly what is the reason, the interns, or your lack of knowledge in certain fields...) that you weren't sure how to handle.

    But then, as people answered your request for counsel, you answered as if your team was great, the job was getting done, what you and your team accomplished, and that you didn't see the point to change your views.
    This past week things DID change. What else can/should I say?

    Quote Originally Posted by molona
    And again, you point out several reasons to explain why things didn't happen as you wished (like that you moved recently from one office to another, changes in the company structure, etc).
    Descriptive fragments to assist in understanding the overall issue that was going on.

    Quote Originally Posted by molona
    Sometimes you sound like if you knew what to do and that this thread is not much use to you, and sometimes you sound like if you don't know what to do next (which is the normal thing for a first-time manager ).
    Maybe my problem is consistency? My problems with much of what I have originally posted about in here have improved.

    Quote Originally Posted by molona
    When someone gives you general advice, you are OK, but if it is something specific, then you look like a bit defensive and try to justify yourself.

    Something is just not right.
    Sorry if it was something I posted. Keep in mind that emotions do not get transferred along with internet relayed messages. You definately gave me food for thought though. I apologize for any inconvenience.

  11. #36
    #titanic {float:none} silver trophy
    molona's Avatar
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    No inconvenience at all. As I said, it could be me and my lack of understanding.

  12. #37
    SitePoint Zealot marbly's Avatar
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    4.) Simply because "I said so".
    thats so last century

    I skimmed through the thread and I guess I can agree with most of the posts said.

    Although being a manager and being a leader are two different positions (or jobs if you will) in a company, it's often the case that a manager is expected to also be the leader, the supervisor, the glue that keeps everything together etc etc

    It's a very demanding position even for a person with experience and good people skills. I'll try to pull out some useful tips out of my limited knowledge of this subject:

    - consciously make more time in your schedule to attend to your team
    Time is #1 problem in these issues IMO. Show them you understand that team is important and that they can reach you, (they showed you they need you - "doors closed", but they won't come to you unless you encourage them and you need to keep encouraging them).

    This can be a weekly or daily meeting where you let them talk about their issues and then try to help them, maybe you can do something that seems small to you but is very big to them, you can't know this unless you communicate. Most of the time they just need you to hear them


    - be friendly
    you're the boss, you set the rules, you were given more responsibility and options, thats why it is you who needs to set the standards (for everything, including communication), you are expected to show initiative. So far you've showed them you only care for the business results (get this done by next week type), you didn't show you consider them your team.

    To be a successful manager you have to understand that you can't treat people as if they were tools, you have to form relationships with them. The quality of that relationship is what sets your longterm productivity level.

    If you raise your voice and order them around, it can even work for that one time but it's a bad strategy longterm. You can scare them into doing something, but you will lose their respect and whats most important - their motivation.

    Your job actually is to create such atmosphere where people are selfmotivated to do what you need them to do. Sounds tricky I know, but only when you get to that stage will you be able to say that you've drawn the maximum


    it doesn't necessarily relate to you Wolf
    it's a very interesting topic and I hope my .02 help

  13. #38
    SitePoint Wizard Wolf_22's Avatar
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    Thanks Marbly. I appreciate your feedback.

  14. #39
    SitePoint Zealot smadeira's Avatar
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    Free advice from somebody who has been in management for a long time.

    You have a decision to make at some point in your career. Do you want to be in management or do you want to be an individual contributor (i.e., worker.) The two are very different from each other and if you are good at one you may not be very good at the other.

    As a manager/leader your job is to make yourself available to your employees when they need you (leave the door open.) Your "productivity" is being available to help them as quickly as you can. You need to understand your people, what motivates them (it will be different for each of them) and then do what you can to give them the environment they need to be successful. If they take advantage of you then you need to be fair and firm with them following an appropriate corrective action process.

    As their leader, you need to go into meetings with other functions and departments defending them "to the death." They are what will make you successful. If something goes well, then you openly and loudly give the team the credit. If something goes wrong, you step up and take responsibility since it was under your leadership that the problem occured. Then you go back to the team and privately discuss what happened and figure out how to make it work better next time. Leadership is about everything but you. You are pulled in at least 2 different directions at all times.

    If you also have "real work" to do, then you need to come in early, stay late, skip lunch, etc. to get that done in around your role as the leader.

    The point about "I said so" is bogus. You should never need to do that and if you do, there are bigger problems. A leader gets buy-in to what needs to be done and also accepts the ideas of the people they are leading. If you have to use the words "I said so" then you are are done and should be looking for your next career opportunity. They already know you have the power to tell them what to do. A good leader will let them find their way quickly to the same (or better) conclusion which engages the team.

    From your posts it sounds like you are a young professional in your 20s. One thing that you probably won't accept (and I didn't until after the fact) is that you most likely won't be a good leader until after you turn 30. The maturity required of the leader just isn't there in the 20-somethings. There are always exceptions but my observations of many leaders of all ages is that at around 30, perspective and maturity kick-in (for better or worse) and the leadership skills have an environment in which to develop.

    Now, if you don't want to lead then there is nothing wrong with being the individual contributor that handles the technical issues, becomes the expert and is the go-to guy on a project. There is tremendous career opportunity there. The advice I give you for the long term is decide which path is most appealing and work your butt off to be the best you can be at it. The worst thing a company can do is take their top technical person and "reward" them by making them a manager or leader unless the person has that skillset and interest in addition to their technical skills. The two worlds are so different that you need to figure out which one is best for you.

    Again, free advice from one that has been down both roads. I'm sure there are others that will disagree with what I said but it is what I have observed over the last 20 years.

    Good Luck.....
    Scott

  15. #40
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    go check out www.personalmba.com read some books on management, they would really help you.

  16. #41
    SitePoint Zealot soezzy's Avatar
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    Password protect your computer, and make sure your files lock if you are worried about employees stealing the information in them, if the important stuff is locked away then an open door policy works best.

    It will soon be "known" that when your door is closed you are doing something "important" or "private" but as soon as you are through the door should be opened again.

    If you are seen to be working with other members of staff then the respect and productivity will rise. If you think that other members of staff work for you, then you better be the owner of the company, and you had better be prepared for the day when someone doesn't support what you are doing and lets you fall flat on your face...

    If it hasn't happened yet, I can tell you it will only be a matter of time before it does.

    Reading a few good books on management will help, as will a swift cource in humility, I'm told it works wonders. ;-)


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