SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 66
  1. #26
    Put your best practices away. The New Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,087
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Learn PHP simply because you have way more fun developing for it. This is because it is easy to make a web app. With C/C++ your basically stuck to console programming when your a beginner. Boring.
    "A nerd who gets contacts
    and a trendy hair cut is still a nerd"

    - Stephen Colbert on Apple Users

  2. #27
    SitePoint Guru themightystephen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    608
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think anyone unless they are an absolute genius can learn C++ (who hasnt had much programming experience) can learn it in 2 months!
    Get your heelys now at flywalk.co.uk - But what are heelys?
    Heelys are simply shoes with wheels in the heels!

    Flywalk.co.uk - The UK Heelys Retailer

  3. #28
    Life is strife TriGeminal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Trigeminal Ganglion
    Posts
    633
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by viv5
    No need.
    PHP is easier than C++.

    For those who want to learn C++:
    Learn PHP first and then go for C++
    Actually, I can't agree more
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil ..
    .. is for good men to do nothing"
    Edmund Burke.

  4. #29
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy someonewhois's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,364
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Gator99
    Probably like asking should I learn to drive a car before I learn to ride a bicycle.
    It's like playing with medicine balls for 10 minutes so that you'll have no problems playing a 60 minute basketball game.

    Quote Originally Posted by viv5
    No need.
    PHP is easier than C++.

    For those who want to learn C++:
    Learn PHP first and then go for C++
    That's like going and playing basketball with a tennis ball, and then trying to play a 60 minute game with a basketball. It's just going to make your life harder.

    Quote Originally Posted by The New Guy
    Learn PHP simply because you have way more fun developing for it. This is because it is easy to make a web app. With C/C++ your basically stuck to console programming when your a beginner. Boring.
    I jumped straight into the Windows APIs and started making Windows apps first. I only used console apps for learning the language (playing around with stuff basically). I guess it depends what your motivations are for learning -- mine was to develop a Windows application for a client.

  5. #30
    Colonel Jack O'neill Josh_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    689
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm learning C++ in school right now, over a year after I started with PHP. I know alot more than everybody else does because of it. It works both ways, is what I'm trying to say.

  6. #31
    SitePoint Evangelist chiphunt1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    louisville, ky
    Posts
    436
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My advantage when it came to learning C is that I had lots of experience with other languages so it didn't take me any time at all to learn it. However I'd argue that it's not unreasonable for even a beginner to learn C in less that 2 months if he is quick-witted.
    Well, I can program in C and I assume you can as well, but to say you "know" C in two months is preposterous. There are professors with multiple PHD's that will tell you they still don't completely "know" C. Anyway, don't want to debate with you. My last point is, to tell the person asking these questions that in two months they can be programming data structures built up from blocks of memory allocated from the heap at run-time with pointers is a bit of a stretch.

  7. #32
    Web Design Ireland cianuro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Dublin Ireland
    Posts
    914
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I learned C in Uni, and tought myself PHP. They are VERY similar, however PHP is much simpler. If you see no future need to learn C, I would not. Its quite a big undertaking IMHO.

    Just dive into PHP.

  8. #33
    SitePoint Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    986
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You'll only need two languages:

    C++ for speed (large 3d games)
    Ruby for everything else (websites, GUI-applications, even small 3d games) - it's much easier than PHP.

    So, if you don't want large 3d games, learn Ruby. After that, you'll never even think about learning PHP.

  9. #34
    ********* wombat firepages's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    1,717
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You'll only need two languages:

    C++ for speed (large 3d games)
    PHP for everything else (websites, GUI-applications, even small 3d games) - it's much easier than Ruby.

    So, if you don't want large 3d games, learn PHP. After that, you'll never even think about learning Ruby.

    mod_ruby ... guffawff

  10. #35
    ********* wombat firepages's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    1,717
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    sorry about the above , too easy

    If you want to lean C/C++ then go for it , but you don't need it to learn and use PHP.

    You dont need to know C to build your server , compile and install the OS, webserver,database and PHP itself , you may need to know how to configure all of the above (remotely)

    If you are working in the web-arena then learning basics of networking / network protocols , server-management , DNS configuration etc are far more useful to you in the real world, when you have that cracked learn C.

    If after all that you are bored , learn Ruby

  11. #36
    SitePoint Addict n0other's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    C requires you to know how computer memory is organized, you are probably going to get stuck on pointers and so on. C++, well, it's a derivative of C with additional features (OOP and so on). I believe it's also not an option. Start simple, start PHP, start with something that suites you best. 'Learning' a language is easy, it takes alot of time to learn how to _program_ in general. As they say, it takes 10 years to become proficient in any field, programming included.

  12. #37
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My first language was PHP and I didn't encounter any major problems aside from the ones every newbie runs into

    I also found that my knowledge in PHP helped me alot when I started to learn C/C++ because of the similarities in syntax. So it works both ways

  13. #38
    Web Design Ireland cianuro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Dublin Ireland
    Posts
    914
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    good point haxr.

    n0other: Thats true, with PHP you dont run into pointers and their ... emmm, association with arrays PHP makes arrays simple.

  14. #39
    Web Design Ireland cianuro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Dublin Ireland
    Posts
    914
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry, KEEPS arrays simple.

  15. #40
    SitePoint Addict myrdhrin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    211
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Same take as mmj on this....

    learn only the language you need. As you come accross other projects you'll probably need to learn other languages and the knowledge you'll already have will help you grasp details and differences. What you want to know altought is some object/procedural programming, data structure and common algorithm. Those will save you a lot of mistakes and you can use them wathever language you're using (if the language support it).
    Jean-Marc (aka Myrdhrin)
    M2i3 - blog - Protect your privacy with Zliki

  16. #41
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    59
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think most of the Php Programmers didnt know C/C++...

  17. #42
    Non-Member cmpolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    SysChat.Com - you should be too!
    Posts
    460
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I learned C++ before I learned PHP. (I didnt plan it that way) But it was really easier to learn PHP and C++ is quite easy to learn. And you arent limited to console programs with C++, like the new guy said!

  18. #43
    SitePoint Addict gl3nnx's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    at http://www.gl3nnx.net
    Posts
    343
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    PHP is a good prog language, i think PHP is enough to solve ur proglramming needs. C/C++ is a powerful language, robust. but its hard to code. PHP rules! hehe

  19. #44
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    97
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by viv5
    No need.
    PHP is easier than C++.

    For those who want to learn C++:
    Learn PHP first and then go for C++
    What I'm doing at the moment, I've been developing with php for a couple of years, to expand my mind and because I love learning I'm learning c++ at the moment.

  20. #45
    SitePoint Evangelist CapitalWebHost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Posts
    417
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I haven't programmed in C/C++ for years (used DOS based compiler ). But I think that it is not necessary. Sure it makes it easier to learn other languages, but PHP is not C++ like in syntax for the most part and aside from using classes and a few syntactical expressions, there is not much in common.

    In actuality, PHP is more like Basic in it's free form flow.

  21. #46
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I already know PHP, and I'm looking to learn C or C++. Where should I start, so I don't have to go through all the boring basics I already know?

  22. #47
    SitePoint Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    986
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Who the hell wants to learn C/C++?? Do you plan to re-write DirectX or so? You'll never need these languages. Go for C#/Java/Ruby/Python/other language. Why learn a low-level-language? Low-level-languages are only good for speed, and who needs speed these days? Sure, big 3d games need speed. So if you don't plan on writing these, choose a high-level-language. I'm sure that if you write a C/C++ program you could do it twice as fast in Ruby.

    Please compare:

    C++ (is the syntax correct?, compare this to the readable Ruby code)
    for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
    print "hi";
    }

    Ruby (even my mum could understand this):
    5.times { print "hi" }

    This thing will run 0.01 sec faster in C++. Who cares?

    A friend wanted to learn a programming language. I gave him this loop in PHP and Ruby. What did he say? "I want to learn PHP, Ruby is too easy, nobody will be impressed when I write Ruby code because they'll understand it."

  23. #48
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Fenrir2
    Who the hell wants to learn C/C++?? Do you plan to re-write DirectX or so? You'll never need these languages. Go for C#/Java/Ruby/Python/other language. Why learn a low-level-language? Low-level-languages are only good for speed, and who needs speed these days?
    I don't want to learn ruby. My desire rests solely in C and/or C++. The entire reason I want to use these languages is speed. I've used programs written in higher-level languages, and they run like garbage. The programs I plan to design, which extensively use loops, are slow, cpu-intensive, and unstable. Please don't try to persuade me to learn another language, because I have my reasons for learning C versus learning something else.

    I already know PHP, and I absolutely love it. The syntax is in NO way an issue, I'm fully comfortable with programming syntaxes. PHP is sometimes too slow, and too difficult to give to other people, and use in places there's no internet. I want to use C/C++ to gain speed and versatility.

    I apoligize if this response seems like an attack, but that response was completely against what I was asking.

    Now, not to be rude or anything, but does anyone actually feel like answering my question? Thanks.

  24. #49
    One website at a time mmj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Melbourne Australia
    Posts
    6,282
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Fenrir2
    Who the hell wants to learn C/C++?? Do you plan to re-write DirectX or so? You'll never need these languages. Go for C#/Java/Ruby/Python/other language. Why learn a low-level-language?
    C++ isn't a low-level language. Assembler is a low level language. If you're going to write audio or video processing algorithms from scratch and make them fast (not to mention 3d games), you'll need some assembler (and some intimate knowledge of processor architecture). Other than that, C++ is a good all round programming language, and you don't need to know about the processor it's running on.
    [mmj] My magic jigsaw
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    The Bit Depth Blog Twitter Contact me
    Neon Javascript Framework Jokes Android stuff

  25. #50
    SitePoint Zealot bronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    148
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, we need more categories to adequately label the different languages.
    When people talk about a "high level language", they are referring to the amount of abstraction provided.

    Assembler-dialects are basically not abstracted at all, they are the lowest form of (human-readable) programming languages.

    Then comes languages like C/C++, which are more abstracted but are still quite close to the hardware (if you want them to be). You manage memory manually (much like you do in ASM although C/C++ simplifies the process), and you can even write Assembler directly into the C/C++ code should you feel like it.

    Up the ladder we have languages like C#/Java and Ruby/Python/Perl, which run in Virtual Machines or interpreters. They are substantially more abstracted than C/C++ are, and can quite accurately be described as high level languages.

    So if we want to use the high/low labels, you could say that Assembler is Low, C/C++ are Medium-High and C#/Java/Ruby/Python/Perl are High.

    Maybe we should start an effort to ditch the "Low/High Level"-labels and use a numeric scale to measure the amount of abstraction, where ASM is 0? That way we would get less posts (not just on SitePoint but everywhere) where people are having pointless (both are right, both are wrong) discussions about the level of C/C++.

    Now, to a more on-topic note: Girard747, I suggest you pick up a copy of the Practical C++ Programming book by O'Reilly. It does provide an overview of the basics (to freshen up your memory and to make sure you're on the up-and-up with C++ specifics) and then dives in to showing you Real World(tm) code and explaining all the parts of C++ in a good way.

    If you want to learn C, the only real book to choose is the C Programming Language, 2nd Ed by Kernighan and Ritchie. It describes all the pieces of the ANSI C standard (not the absolute latest standard is covered in the book, but instead you can be sure that code you learn in that book will run under any future standard) and it really is the best book on the topic. Especially if you already know how to program.

    Also, if you want to decide between C and C++, I can tell you that the C book is 272 pages long, and that includes a full summary of the ANSI C Standard Library. The C++ book on the other hand is 549 pages long.

    While it's highly unscientific, the difference in page numbers do describe the difference in complexity between the two languages. Although it should be noted that those 549 pages also cover the basics of C++, which are pretty much the same as the basics of C (I.E some of what's covered in the 272 pages of the C-book).

    I hope that was of some help to you. If you want more help/resources on C-related programming, you can go to the CProgramming.com forum.
    If there is a way to overcome the suffering, there is no need to worry; if there is no way to overcome the suffering, there is no point to worry.
    - Shantideva


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •