SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 51 to 59 of 59
  1. #51
    SitePoint Wizard TWTCommish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Posts
    3,910
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Re: Sorry, but no.

    Originally posted by rgremill
    TWTCommish the developers most likely do not know the client's business. If the client says their customer's prefer lime green and pink who are you to argue?
    Well, if I'm a professional web designer, I'm probably someone who's studied color theory a heckuva lot more than they have. That's the whole point: none of these companies have customer surveys concerning what colors they would like to see on a website.

    Knowing the client's business does not come to play in all aspects of development. It matters more in terms of functionality, and of various sections of the site. In the example of pink and green, unless they have something solid, like a survey, then they're talking out of something other than their mouth D), and it'd be a bit rude to not express disagreement.

  2. #52
    :) delemtri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    579
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes rgremill, it's a beautiful thing.

    I'm gonna offer my opinion up into this whole little mini-debate: Don't be extreme and go off on a tangent and don't just do what the client wants. If you say, "Green and pink suck, cause so and so and blah and blah," and the client says "Well we still want it," then you should consider giving them green and pink. But make sure you do voice your opinions about something that could be a detriment to both you and them.

  3. #53
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy Jeremy W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,121
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If the last dozen posts (especially beley's) aren't what I said, forgive me.

    I never meant to imply that things go "my way" and never the client's. The first 2 weeks of any contract are spent finding out what the client wants, what the users want and balancing those 2. That's why I said I rarely get into these discussions and when I do I have to draw a line somewhere, depending on how bad the decision would be for the client's business.

    For instance, one client absolutely wanted a bulletin board for a site that statistically showed it would be useless and viewed as intrusive. We ran some market research which then confirmed it. He put it on anyways. The board sunk. He was happy he'd tried and didn't hold it against us (yes we had him sign a disclaimer, it is the best thing to do).

    Having said that, it could just as easily have gone the other way. He might have wanted something as extreme as lime green and pink (though we've never had anything this extreme). What we did have once (the only contract I walked away from) was a client who insisted on ASP on an xNix system. As an asp developer (and on the opinions of my "real" developers) I told him we couldn't in all good conscience put the 2 together, stated our reasons, examples, everything. He was adamant and volunteered to add another 5K to the contract simply to have asp on an xNix system. We walked away.

    edit: And referred him to a solid company who would do what he wanted, and do it well.
    Last edited by Jeremy W.; Jul 12, 2001 at 03:50.
    SVP Marketing, SoCast SRM
    Personal blog: Strategerize
    Twitter: @jeremywright

  4. #54
    SitePoint Evangelist
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    559
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Another team idea

    All of this debate has given me an idea for another team.

    What if your team consisted of:

    1.) Programmer
    2.) Graphic Artist
    3.) Industry Expert / Sales

    Pick any industry and find an expert in that field who has been around for 20 years. The industry expert should have hundreds of contacts. This person will allow your team to provide web services to a niche market.

  5. #55
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy Jeremy W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,121
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That'd work (though I'd still need a customer service rep).

    I mean, most combinations can work so long as you don't see a great "gap" in the skillset
    SVP Marketing, SoCast SRM
    Personal blog: Strategerize
    Twitter: @jeremywright

  6. #56
    SitePoint Addict michaelwheaton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    338
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, this is getting quite interesting and a little of topic - but that's okay. It amazes me how a question about what your ideal web development team would be can turn into a discussion about customer relations, amputated feet, ugly colors, and religion. Thanks for all of the posts, I've found them really helpful. And I disagree with Beley who said "We are all professionals (well, except for the 13 yr olds :-)". I was 13 when I posted this question- but I'm glad I'm over 13 because now I guess I'm a "professional". Being young does limit the amount of experience you have but you should not be judged at all by your age. There are many people on these forums who are under 15 and do much better work than the 20 years olds, age just doesn't matter.

  7. #57
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy Jeremy W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,121
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I admire your spirit

    I believe that at the age of 13-16 most of what you have is raw talent. You are good at what you do, but often (not always) don't have the business sense or training to be able to do a complete web experience for, say, Ford.

    Having said, that, I started when I was 14, so I know where you're coming from. You've worked hard, you put a lot of heart and sould into every page and for all intents and purposes you are a "professional" becuase you earn money and respect doing this. I'm not demeaing that, please understand me.

    However, if 2 people had identical skillsets and one had more experience I'd have to say the one with more experience would win. Thus, younger folk are at a distinct disadvantage, but often with good reason.

    It is few and far between that you find a youngster able to handle the criticisms and responsibility of a young company. However, that may well be you and everyone on these boards, I'm not saying you aren't a professional, please hear that.

    If you love something, do it with everything that's in you
    SVP Marketing, SoCast SRM
    Personal blog: Strategerize
    Twitter: @jeremywright

  8. #58
    K, Dan K Dan_K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Perth - Western Australia
    Posts
    475
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Dream Team

    Hi, I would have:

    One Programmer, know's the works
    One Graphic Designer
    One sales Rep, for client contact
    One administration member, handle the business documents

    And me (project manager) to do:
    A bit of each- programming, graphic design etc
    Design- design the pages
    Hold the rest of the team together
    And kept the projects on task

    Later

    - Dan

  9. #59
    SitePoint Enthusiast welded's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    vancouver.bc.ca
    Posts
    96
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i am reminded of a story i read on a list apart a little while back...

    anyway, i have no formal training, and i would consider myself a jack-of-all-trades. i can do at least a little bit of a whole lot of things. to best compliment my current skillset i would like a talented graphics artist and a knowledgable programmer. i can handle these aspects myself, but i spend more time on them than i am happy to. preferably these people are able to handle other tasks as well, such as having the graphics guy do some script installation and some simple modifications, and have the coder have strong customer relations skills.
    it's amazing what velocity can do
    when human beings are in season


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •