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  1. #1
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy KLB's Avatar
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    Interesting article on the Advertising industry and AdBlock

    I stumbled across http://english.ohmynews.com/articlev...32947&rel_no=1 today. It is an interesting read and brings up interesting points that could make for a good discussion.

    I think many of here, myself included, feel that advertising is the grease allows us to generate our content and run our websites, and without advertising many good informational sites would not exist or at least wouldn't be "free." This article, however, does provide food for thought.
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  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy KLB's Avatar
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    I found another article today from a totally different perspective from the article I mentioned above. It is: http://www.webpronews.com/ebusiness/...vertising.html
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  3. #3
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    isn't the way around adblock to simply serve the CPM ads from your own server?

  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy KLB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krohnathlonman
    isn't the way around adblock to simply serve the CPM ads from your own server?
    Ad blocking dilutes the effectiveness of the CPM ads, thus in time advertisers are won't pay as much per CPM. Also, compared to other methods like CPC, CPM doesn't pay as much for many sites. The way I handle the issue is to block users who have ad-blocking engaged. They may not turn off ad-blocking to access my site, but at the same time I don't waste bandwidth on them. From time to time, I also help other sites implement different levels of ad blocking countermeasures. Sometimes it is just making the ads harder to block, and other times it is to block users who are blocking ads all toghether

    In regards to the two articles, I think they both take an extreme position on the same issue but in the opposite direction. Thus I thought they could make for a good discussion.
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  5. #5
    SitePoint Zealot oalhajjar's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing the articles. The first article, with the crazy neo-consumer ranting about the evils of advertising, is terrible!

    But I think AdBlock is interesting. I bet the majority of people who opt to install, configure, and run adblock are only those techno-whizes who don't respond to internet ads anyways!

    That's one less non-converting impression that has to be served. Conversion rates will go up for the advertiser because there's less non-converting customers viewing the ad (does this make sense)?

    Sure, impressions overall would drop, but the drop in impressions simply means that the most anti-advertising consumers are no longer being served (which might be a good thing).

    I doubt the typical internet surfer (who doens't use firefox) can be bothered to spend time finding, installing, configuring, and troubleshooting a software that blocks ads.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy KLB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oalhajjar
    Thanks for sharing the articles. The first article, with the crazy neo-consumer ranting about the evils of advertising, is terrible!
    I got a good chuckle out of it, but it just seemed too far out to simply pass up without discussing.

    Quote Originally Posted by oalhajjar
    But I think AdBlock is interesting. I bet the majority of people who opt to install, configure, and run adblock are only those techno-whizes who don't respond to internet ads anyways!

    That's one less non-converting impression that has to be served. Conversion rates will go up for the advertiser because there's less non-converting customers viewing the ad (does this make sense)?
    It makes perfect sense and actually this makes for a great way to qualify and weed users. I use ad-blocking countermeasures on my chemistry site, which denies access to those who are blocking my ads unless they pay for a subscription. My thought is if users don't want ads, that's fine, but they still have to "pay" for my content one way or another. This payment can either be via a fee based subscription or by accepting my ads.

    A side effect of my countermeasures has been to control bandwidth costs while increasing the amount of revenue I earn per 1,000 page views. The reason being those who are blocking my ads, and thus do not allow me to generate ad revenue, are kept out of my site and rather than pay my subscription fee, use the site of my competitors. From an advertiser's perspective, this leaves my site with high quality traffic, which is worth more.

    So in the end, I win in five ways, 1) I control bandwidth costs; 2) I improve by ad revenues because of higher quality users; 3) I cost my competitor more bandwidth because of the users I reject that then have to go elsewhere; 4) I reduce the quality of users my competitors get because they are getting ad-blocking users I rejected and; 5) I get higher quality ads because of higher quality users.



    Quote Originally Posted by oalhajjar
    Sure, impressions overall would drop, but the drop in impressions simply means that the most anti-advertising consumers are no longer being served (which might be a good thing).

    I doubt the typical internet surfer (who doens't use firefox) can be bothered to spend time finding, installing, configuring, and troubleshooting a software that blocks ads.
    Except you are forgetting about for the fact that the ability to block ads is coming as part of easy to use programs like ZoneAlarm Pro and Norton Internet Security. This makes ad-blocking an easy to access and use ability for regular non-techie users.

    My big question about Internet advertising is, what way is it really headed? I mean these two articles make extreme opposite predictions to serve their own purposes. The truth must lay some where in between, but where exactly?

    Ad-blocking will force websites and advertisers to change tactics and adapt to this threat to their revenue. The question is will advertising continue to become more and more intrusive and obnoxious or will it find a better way to entice users without being obnoxious? Of course this all depends upon what your definition of "obnoxious". How will the arms race between ad-blocking software and websites displaying ads shake out?
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  7. #7
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    I brought up something similer to what you posted in this thread:
    http://www.sitepoint.com/forums/showthread.php?t=262414
    Most people seem to think its the Advertiser issues and not Webmasters, I dont feel that way since if the advertisers cant adapt and close down or whatever most of us are in trouble.

  8. #8
    SitePoint Guru Marubozo's Avatar
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    Another article just popped up on this subject as well, brought up by DoubleClick

    http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/softwar...08,00.htm#cmon

    I agree with this as well, as running a website isn't free. Publishing a newspaper isn't free. Making TV shows isn't free. Usually the only way to get these types of media without advertisements is if you pay for them. If you want commercial free TV, you have to get HBO or Showtime or something like that. If you want commercial free radio, you have to pay for satellite radio. And the list goes on.

    If the ability to block ads continues to grow and become accepted, li ke you said, either the ad companies will have to get even more intrusive to be effective, or webmasters will begin to be forced to charge for access. We would be moving from an internet that was a virtually free source of endless resources, to a premium service that will require consumers to spend money out of their pockets to enjoy the same content.

  9. #9
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy KLB's Avatar
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    What I have learned from 18+ months of blocking users who block my ads is that if one is respectful with the way one implements one's ads, and one carefully, politely explains one's reasons for blocking those who block ads and offers a reasonably priced alternative, most reasonable minded users will understand and accept the conditions to accessing the content. The tiny minority of users who get indignant and scream and fuss about those countermeasures usually end up not being users one wants anyways and by excluding them one is simply eliminating problems and saving bandwidth.

    In fact, with very few exceptions, any indignant complaints I have received over my countermeasures could be directly traced back to some thread in a forum, blog, etc. and the user who complained would have never known about my site had I not implemented my countermeasures.

    From my experience, most users are level headed enough to understand that if they block ads there will be times that they can not access some sites. Also contrary to what most ad-blocking evangelists would like to wish, blocking those who blocks ads has little to no negative effect on the popularity of a website.
    Ken Barbalace: EnvironmentalChemistry.com (Blog, Careers)
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