SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    SitePoint Enthusiast janoble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Littleton, Colorado
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Tomcat/Apache Config Files

    Does anyone know which (all) of the following files pertain to configuring Tomcat and which to configuring Apache and Tomcat to communicate? I know the xxx-auto are generated automatically by tomcat at startup. Some of the others are confusing the daylights out of me. Some of the tomcat-xxx files talk about Jserv which was Tomcats predicessor. I'm trying to get Tomcat and Apache to communicate using Ajp13, which is set up in server.xml and worker.properties, but it seems to only want to use Ajp12. I like to know the limited set of these files which impact Apache and/or Tomcat and ignore the IIS, Netscape, etc. The only way I've been able to do what I want is to copy mod_jk.conf-auto, manually edit it and include the new file in httpd.conf. I'm hoping there's a better way because it complicates the administration of contexts.

    Help!

    build.xml
    iis_redirect.reg-auto
    jni_server.xml
    jni_workers.properties
    manifest.servlet
    mod_jk.conf
    mod_jk.conf-auto
    obj.conf
    obj.conf-auto
    server.xml
    test-tomcat.xml
    tomcat-apache.conf
    tomcat-users.xml
    tomcat.conf
    tomcat.policy
    tomcat.properties
    uriworkermap.properties
    uriworkermap.properties-auto
    web.dtd
    web.xml
    workers.properties
    wrapper.properties
    --
    -je-

  2. #2
    midnight coder
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    The flat edge of the world
    Posts
    838
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I dunno much about Tomcat/Apache setup, but this article seems to explain it pretty well:

    http://www.devshed.com/Client_Side/XML/INTCXX/

  3. #3
    SitePoint Author Kevin Yank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    2,571
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The process of setting up Tomcat and Apache to communicate via Ajp13 is described in my article "JSP Quick-Start Guide" here. Basically you need to edit the server.xml file, which will regenerate mod_jk.conf-auto the next time Tomcat is restarted.

    Do let me know if you're still stuck!
    Kevin Yank
    CTO, sitepoint.com
    I wrote: Simply JavaScript | BYO PHP/MySQL | Tech Times | Editize
    Baby’s got back—a hard back, that is: The Ultimate CSS Reference

  4. #4
    SitePoint Enthusiast janoble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Littleton, Colorado
    Posts
    28
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Kevin,

    I'd already turned on Ajpv13, as far as Tomcat is concerned as suggested in the documentation and your article. However, as per the documentation, this does not create a mod_jk.conf-auto that uses Ajpv13. To do that you must copy mod_jk.conf-auto to another file and change all the JkMount lines to use Ajp13 rather than the default Ajp12, and then include the new file instead. To verify this, look inside the mod_jk.conf-auto file and look for Ajp13. The problem with the technique of using another file is that you then must add any new contexts manually to this new file whenever you create a new one. I posted a previous message about this and asked wasn't there a better way. Actually I was discussing how to get rid of /servlet.

    However, this doesn't answer my previous question, about which configuration files impact/modify/change the configuration when using Apache-mod_jk-Tomcat. I think this is a more fundamental question with so many files in the conf directory that I suspect don't impact my configuration. Part of the confusion is how much jibberish there is in the documentation that mentions or discusses JServ and mod_jserv. All I want to know is which files in the conf directory apply for my configuration.I suspect they are limited to:

    mod_jk.conf
    mod_jk.conf-auto
    server.xml
    tomcat-apache.conf
    tomcat-users.xml
    tomcat.conf
    tomcat.policy
    tomcat.properties
    web.xml
    workers.properties
    wrapper.properties

    I'm beginning to suspect even the tomact.xxx, and tomcat-apache.conf files don't apply.

    There are just too many options (Apache, IIS, Netscape, mod_jk, mod_jserv, etc.) to make it clear. I have Apache/Tomcat running on four Windows machines (98 & NT), a Linux box, and two Solaris 7 Ultra10's. All of them work, and most are straight out of the box using mod_jk.conf-auto thus without Ajp13. However, as we begin to use them more in our development and expect them to do more we need to be able to configure them. I find myself editing a file to change something and then find it didn't change the configuration of anything I'm running. I've tried the tomcat-users mailing list and their archives, but only get,"I don't know, but I didn't change anything", or "I don't know, but I only changed xxx". There's never been an authoritative answer to such a fundamental question. Once I know which files impact a given configuration, I can comfortably go in the file change something and see the effect. I find myself modifying a file and then wondering why it didn't change anything.

    THANKS
    -joe-
    --
    -je-

  5. #5
    SitePoint Author Kevin Yank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    2,571
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wish I could give you an authoritative answer, Joseph, but the reality is that I'm still among the people who have worked with Tomcat 'only enough to get it working'. I'll be doing a lot more work with it in coming months, but at the moment I am ill-equipped to answer your question.

    If it makes you feel better, I believe you criticisms of Tomcat and its documentation are completely valid. There is little love for Tomcat's implementation in the server-side Java community. Remember, Tomcat was designed more as a reference implementation of the JSP/Servlet/EJB standards than a commercial-grade application server. Commercial offerings such as IBM WebSphere and BEA WebLogic are generally easier to configure and manage.
    Kevin Yank
    CTO, sitepoint.com
    I wrote: Simply JavaScript | BYO PHP/MySQL | Tech Times | Editize
    Baby’s got back—a hard back, that is: The Ultimate CSS Reference


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •