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Thread: aspx/linux/etc

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    aspx/linux/etc

    I'm a marketer totally out of my depth here... need some basic advice. Please and thanks.

    I've just taken a client who has a membership-based site served as aspx. Yhe relationship with his current host/developer is going south and I need to switch to new hosts and find someone to handle the backend stuff.

    Much of the site appears to be poorly structured - needlessly complex and yet lacking certain features. From my own limited knowledge of what I've seen of it, I'd have suggested using a drupal and a bunch of php... but I know little and may be talking out of my butt.

    I'm more comfortable with linux/apache... and I'm guessing that's incompat with the current work - or is it? The database is sql so is it viable to migrate away from aspx? Etc? Any and all constructive advice appreciated. Thanks.

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    Also available in Large Si's Avatar
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    I've reported this to the moderators to move to the .NET forum (you might get more help over there).
    Si
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    ********* Addict DLG_1's Avatar
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    www.discountasp.net is what I use, and I'm very happy with their service.

    I would keep the site on aspx simply because rewriting away from MS would be a ton of work. but I guess it depends on your client.

    you can migrate away from aspx even though the backend is sql server, php can talk to it.
    DLG

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    Thanks.

    I guess what I need now is a non-tech easily-understood comparison of asp vs open source etc. Does the former have real advantages - and if so, what?

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    ********* Addict DLG_1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gulliver
    Thanks.

    I guess what I need now is a non-tech easily-understood comparison of asp vs open source etc. Does the former have real advantages - and if so, what?
    hear that? that's a can of worms opening up.

    Personally i was a java guy, and now I'm an MS C# guy. love the language, love the support, love the massive amounts of free training that MS gives. I would go the aspx route, with the new version of vs 2005 & sql server 2005 and asp.net 2.0 it's going to make things run so much faster.

    The beauty also lies in the true OO development that can be done in the back end. Of course, both sides have their respective pros & cons, and having come from some moderate php programming as well, i'm a converted C# evangelist.

    so I'd go aspx
    DLG

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    ☆★☆★ silver trophy vgarcia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gulliver
    Thanks.

    I guess what I need now is a non-tech easily-understood comparison of asp vs open source etc. Does the former have real advantages - and if so, what?
    Of course the Microsoft route has benefits, just like open source does. With Microsoft products, you as a business have someone that can be held accountable for things like support, upgrades, bug fixes, security updates, etc, especially if you have an agreement with them. With open source you either have to go into the code and hack it to your fitting, hire somebody, or wait around for the next release which may or may not have the feature you need. Now of course, the fact that you can even see the source code is touted as a benefit of open source and a drawback to MS products, so it is a two-way street. Just use what's best for the job, and in this case I'd probably recommend that you stick with .NET, especially if the site in its current form doesn't have major problems that have to be dealt with by rewriting large chunks of code. If it ain't broke don't fix it

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    Snowboarders die even younger igor.kudela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLG_1
    hear that? that's a can of worms opening up.

    Personally i was a java guy, and now I'm an MS C# guy. love the language, love the support, love the massive amounts of free training that MS gives. I would go the aspx route, with the new version of vs 2005 & sql server 2005 and asp.net 2.0 it's going to make things run so much faster.

    The beauty also lies in the true OO development that can be done in the back end. Of course, both sides have their respective pros & cons, and having come from some moderate php programming as well, i'm a converted C# evangelist.

    so I'd go aspx
    amen
    Igor Kudela
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    Snowboarders die even younger igor.kudela's Avatar
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    u say u are more comfortable with linux/apache look at this www.mono-project.com
    it is a .NET port for linux and runs aspx beutifully
    Igor Kudela
    NetPublisher - FREE Customizable .NET CMS

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    Quote Originally Posted by gulliver
    I'm a marketer totally out of my depth here...
    ...
    I know little and may be talking out of my butt.
    You sure are - on both accounts. Moreover, if you're a marketer, why on earth are you being asked about technical things??

    Quote Originally Posted by gulliver
    I've just taken a client who has a membership-based site served as aspx.
    .....
    Much of the site appears to be poorly structured - needlessly complex and yet lacking certain features.
    ...
    I'm more comfortable with linux/apache... and I'm guessing that's incompat with the current work - or is it? The database is sql so is it viable to migrate away from aspx? Etc?
    Again - why are you even involved with things a marketer has nothing to do with? I don't get this at all. It would be like someone asking me a detailed question about marketing - and I'd be making up crap trying to come up with some response when I shouldn't have been asked in the first place.

    To explain it as non-technically as I can, if it's already in ASP.Net, then it would usually (exception in next paragraph) be alot more work to change the platform. What you normally do is refactor bits of it at a time to improve it and make it more structured as you put it, while keeping or increasing the functionality. Otherwise you are doing something that has no value to the customer and creating a lot of waste.

    * The exception of course is if it's a big horrible mess which would take longer to add functionality than to redo it from scratch. In that case, a change of platform is fine as you are starting over anyway. But beware that this is a big decision as it costs alot to the customer.

    Quote Originally Posted by gulliver
    From my own limited knowledge of what I've seen of it, I'd have suggested using a drupal and a bunch of php... but I know little and may be talking out of my butt.
    I assume you got all this information from some guy who likes php. It is biased. Both php and .net have strong advantages and are both great for building web apps. There are differences of course, but to be even discussing drupal as a marketer indicates that you have been exposed to a php environment but not a .net environment. And since you will be hiring someone to do the technical work, it would be a very misinformed decision to want to go with php simply because you have been exposed to that before.

    If you are part of a company who does web design, the speak to a technical person there about it, and find out if there even is anyone there that does anything not php - otherwise it will likely be biased. In that case though, how would your company be able to do work on a web site done in asp.net anyway?

    Regards,
    Eli

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    Picking up some points... and thanks all for the constructive response...

    >if you're a marketer, why on earth are you being asked about technical things?

    More than 'marketer', I'm 'developer'... I design and build commercial operations by bringing together the various elements. Part of my 'job' is 'to know a little about a lot of things'... hence this requirement.

    >recommend that you stick with .NET, especially if the site in its current form doesn't have major problems that have to be dealt with by rewriting large chunks of code. If it ain't broke don't fix it.

    Therein lies the problem. I suspect it's a failing of poor implementation rather than a failing of the aspx platform. Example: the site features a forum which lacks basic features of the free php boards - like a simple 'edit own post' facility. The user 'blogs' aren't even close to MT/typepad/blogger standard. There's much more.

    Thanks for the mono link.

    >...refactor bits of it at a time to improve it and make it more structured as you put it, while keeping or increasing the functionality.

    Again, 'gap in my knowledge' here - I don't know what net/aspx is capable of. With drupal, I've slightly more familiarity and know that it can handle my requirement: for subscription-based community services including user profile page/microsite, user blog, private messenging between users, web/pop user email, forums etc. And needs to be linked to an affilate scheme. Probably also a bunch of other features I've forgotten.

    >how would your company be able to do work on a web site done in asp.net anyway?

    I'm freelance - and hire-in the help. Hence the need to get some more info on aspx. Seriously, I'm keen to hear from someone who can advise appropriately and help deliver the optimal solution.


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