SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 51 to 53 of 53
  1. #51
    SitePoint Zealot
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I must admit I don't understand. You originally said that PHP doesn't compete on their turf, and now you're saying that if you designed your architecture differently (made it mroe "web-centric") PHP would be fine.

    For example, I don't see how you can get session failover in PHP a lot of ground-up development. The whole point of middleware is that type of thing is a configuration setting ... and some apps have requirements that mean this kind of feature is absolutely essential - you can't drop any Session or Request on failure. Similarly with distributed transactions. I mean, you can probably deal with disparate data stores in PHP, start transactions, roll back on error individually, but that's a huge amount of work ... what happens if there is a failure ON COMMIT of Transaction B, but you've already commited Transaction A? Having support for 2-Phase commit in your middle tier means that you have a single API to handle this process across all your data stores.

    Perhaps one answer is that the PHP world tends to use existing solutions for scaling and distribution like Apache, LDAP, Oracle, etc. rather than some custom middleware.
    Apache, LDAP, Oracle, etc are not middleware and are designed to solve completely different problems. You can (and in most cases probably would) use all of these technologies with your middleware.

    Personally I see a great advantage to php working towards tighter intregration with other languages, letting php does what it does best and then letting other languages deal with things where their strength lies rather than trying to make one language do everything.
    Definitely. I don't think it's any coincidence that the PHP5 object model looks a lot like Java's which looks a lot like .Net's ... interoperability is absolutely crucial.

  2. #52
    SitePoint Wizard
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,672
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree that Java and other are excellent solutions to many of these problems My point was also that just because you (or I) can't see other solutions doesn't mean they don't exist.

    Your two examples of transactional and session integrity are interesting choices. There is another way to look at them. In a three tier system there are three points of failure. What happens if your Transaction API dies mid-transaction? A different solution would be a smart, lightweight top tier talking to Oracle for example. With 2-phase commits or N-phase commits, the point is they still have to be dealt with. In some ways dealing with them farther upstream simplifies the problem.

    Things like session failover can be dealt with robustly with a DB backend and Apache, Squid, etc. Again a different tact at solving the problem, but certainly as solid as others.

    I would in know way imply that PHP is the best solution for every problem. But I think it is a possible solution to more problems that you think.

    I also think it is no coincidence that JSP was created or that Java is getting a foreach statement finally. Everyone learns from each other.
    Christopher

  3. #53
    SitePoint Zealot
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Most of the Enterprise stuff I have dealt with has had multiple databases, and most of those databases were created back in the dark ages ... I always think that it would be smarter to start again, but rarely (actually, never) have had the luxury, in these cases having systems designed specifically for these types of problems is a godsend.

    I also think it is no coincidence that JSP was created
    Totally. We used to do deliver our sites (several thousand of them) in JSP and converted them all to PHP ... personally think that at this level PHP has it way over most of the Java solutions.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •