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  1. #1
    SitePoint Evangelist
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    Logo information

    Hello...

    Is there any site with some kind of tips about how to draw a logo?

    I just want to know some professional topics before starting to design a logo.

    bye:::::::::::::::::

    magi

  2. #2
    SitePoint Evangelist jazztie's Avatar
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    there are of course a couple of key-features

    - logo should represent the company. for instance initials of the company_name, or some object that represents what the company does...

    - logo should represent the feeling of the company and its goals

    - logo should be recognizeable... see next point ->

    - logo shouldn't be too complicated... Keep it Simple

    - use eye-friendly colors, don't use bright/fluorescent green for instance just to make your logo stand out.

    hope this helps,

    Jazz (student usability and graphical design)

  3. #3
    SitePoint Member trinity's Avatar
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    I would add a few more points to that as well.

    1. The logo should look just as good at three feet high as it does at 30 pixels high. The logo needs to scale perfectly and maintain it's impact at any size.

    2. The logo needs to look good both in colour and black & white. Usually what a graphic designer will do when designing a logo is he will create three or four copies.

    a. Full colour version
    b. Grey scale version (using only two or three shades of grey including black and white)
    c. Black logo on white
    d. White logo on black.

    This then will ensure that the logo looks good regardless how it is printed.

    3. Once the logo has been created it needs to be translated into Pantone colours. In order to do this you either need a program that does the translation for you or you need a pantone colour book. The reason for this step is to ensure accurate colour reproduction regardless of printer. Pantone is an internationally recognized colour system. Corporation are very picky that the colour of their logo is reproduced accurately.

    4. Once you have done the above three steps you will need to convert the colour to the closest Hex equivalent for the web.

    My best advice for you is to find a graphic artist with 20 years experience at creating corporate logos and learn everything you can from him/her. This is not something you can learn from a book or a website.

    Trinity
    [www.fuzzylizard.com]
    Web Design | Flash | ColdFusion

  4. #4
    SitePoint Guru sowen's Avatar
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    Trinity excellent advice!

    The only thing I can add to that is this;

    Show a client a CMYK version of the logo first - that's the one a printer will generally use to produce a full colour reproduction of your design. The CMYK colour model is the 'dullest' you will encounter, if you can design a logo your client like using CMYK they will love the version you produce for the web.

  5. #5
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    Thank you all.

    But I've to ask this: Why can I work with RGB colors? I never understant (and never try to) what is CMYK and Pantone...

    Bye and thanks for all your help.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Member trinity's Avatar
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    RGB is Red Green Blue and is the colour space that is used for photography. These are the three primary colours that every other colour is made up of.

    CMYK stands for Cyan Magenta Yellow Black. This is the colour space that printers and any other dye based printing uses. When you print something off on your ink jet printer, you are using CMYK. These are the secondary colours and are the ones used whenever you mixed colours in school.

    Pantone is an indexed colour space. Every colour is given a number and to identify a colour all you do is state the number. Therefore, anyone anywhere will know exactly what number colour is supposed to be used for a print job.

    This is a very basic rundown of these three different colour spaces. My suggestion is to search the adobe web site for everything you can find on colour theory. Before you can do anything in graphic design you MUST understand colour theory.

    trinity
    [www.fuzzylizard.com]
    Web Design | Flash | ColdFusion

  7. #7
    SitePoint Guru sowen's Avatar
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    Magi

    RGB = Red Green Blue

    RGB is what you see on your monitor and your TV. All R all G all B = White i.e. 255:255:255 which in HEx is #FFFFFF. Take some away you get a diffrent colour take it all away you get black #000000. RGB is very vibrant colour model because it used light.

    CMYK = Cyan ink Magenta ink Yellow ink blacK ink

    This is what you see on printed things like magazines. All C all M all Y all K = black, (I know, no C, no M no Y all K is black too, but in print if you REALLY want black you use them all) The most vibrant this colour model can get is all of either Cyan, Yellow or Magenta as soon as you mix two together you start to dull down the colour.

    Pantone inks are mixed with a greater number of base colours, two of which are whites it gets really 'chemical' at this point and I confess I never really bothered looking into the mixing any further. However all you need to know (as a designer) is if you choose a colour from a Pantone book we can print it EXACTLY as you think it will look.

    But, becuase of the diffrent methods of producing the colour in the first place, there is no way of translating one method to the other without some shift.

    So as a graphic designer you should (as Trinity mentioned) start with the lowest quality reproduction, at best Black and white, but if you are talking about a full colour image, then use CMYK. The image can then be reproduced in all the other colour models without having to deal with the 'but it looked better on screen' problem.

    Hope that helps

  8. #8
    SitePoint Evangelist
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    Thank you guys. You are good teachers.

    So.... correct me if I'm wrong:

    The logo should be on CMYK and it's better to have the Pantone values.

    Bye::::::::::::::::::
    Last edited by magi; May 31, 2001 at 03:28.

  9. #9
    SitePoint Wizard creole's Avatar
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    Actually, CMYK would only apply if you will be printing the logo in a 4-color press (CMYK). If you are printing just one or two colors (however many colors your logo is), then you would just use the Pantone values.
    Adobe Certified Coldfusion MX 7 Developer
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  10. #10
    SitePoint Evangelist
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    I've found this:

    http://www.webreference.com/dlab/9701/index.html

    Bye:::::::::::::


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