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  1. #76
    Website Publisher incka's Avatar
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    It's hard work, as everyone seems to say, no short cut. My advice is to make a site on a popular topic that you are interested in, and make it better than all other sites you know... If you do it right in just a few months it can be making you $20 a day... Make 4 of these sites and you've reached your target of $2000 a month...
    Sean Spurr @ Incka Limited
    Fun Games - put games on your site GamesForYourWebsite.com!
    Sites:ABCDEFGHIJ

  2. #77
    SitePoint Evangelist Chromate222's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Musicbox
    if you know how to code applications or programming language then you can make thousands of dollars at http://www.rentacoder.com
    Been there, done that. It's a hard way to make money if you ask me. Shed loads of competition from every angle which drives prices down to the ridiculous. Gets easier once you've built up your own code library though. But I wouldn't recommend it.


  3. #78
    :-) Judith's Avatar
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    Here is how you have to look at it---
    unless you are making a huge investment with staff and funding...it will be a side thing...Think of it as a royalty payment you get each month. --- do something you won't have to update too often and once it is good and done and you have the links and the search engine clout (blahblahblah), the revenue will stream in and I mean stream-not flood.

  4. #79
    SitePoint Evangelist Chromate222's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judith
    Here is how you have to look at it---
    unless you are making a huge investment with staff and funding...it will be a side thing...
    Why look at it like that? It doesn't have to be a sideline income at all. It can be an extremely lucrative primary income. Set your sights high and work hard to achieve them, that's what I say.


  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judith
    Here is how you have to look at it---
    unless you are making a huge investment with staff and funding...it will be a side thing...Think of it as a royalty payment you get each month. --- do something you won't have to update too often and once it is good and done and you have the links and the search engine clout (blahblahblah), the revenue will stream in and I mean stream-not flood.
    Don't agree with this at all. I never made any huge investments with staff or funding when I started The Tech Zone. Total cost start up was zero. It was a hobby - and it's still in a hobby today. Just that this hobby makes six figures.

    If I were to give any piece of advice it would have to be do it because you love it. I never started The Tech Zone for money. I did it because I love computers. If the site didn't make any money I would still be doing it today.

    As for the people who say this is hard work, well that's because they're doing it mostly for the money. When it's your hobby, it's not hard work - It's not even work.

    To me, a huge investments with staff or funding would mean taking TTZ to next level, like Anandtech, Tom's Hardware, or CNet. However, if I do that, it won't be a hobby anymore, it'll be work. And I hate work.

  6. #81
    SitePoint Enthusiast
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moto
    Don't agree with this at all. I never made any huge investments with staff or funding when I started The Tech Zone. Total cost start up was zero. It was a hobby - and it's still in a hobby today. Just that this hobby makes six figures.

    If I were to give any piece of advice it would have to be do it because you love it. I never started The Tech Zone for money. I did it because I love computers. If the site didn't make any money I would still be doing it today.

    As for the people who say this is hard work, well that's because they're doing it mostly for the money. When it's your hobby, it's not hard work - It's not even work.

    To me, a huge investments with staff or funding would mean taking TTZ to next level, like Anandtech, Tom's Hardware, or CNet. However, if I do that, it won't be a hobby anymore, it'll be work. And I hate work.

    very interesting and very very true..the difference between loving to do what you do and doing what seems like work can be a lot for some of us..i love internet and everything to do with it..but if i am working for someone it is not exciting as it is if i am doing something that is for fun etc..

  7. #82
    Non-Member codejunkie's Avatar
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    what's with the run-on. Everybody's stating basically, the same point.

  8. #83
    King of da Wackos Nintendo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by codejunkie
    what's with the run-on. Everybody's stating basically, the same point.
    Could it be because it's correct??!!!
    ...

  9. #84
    SitePoint Evangelist Chromate222's Avatar
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    moto, I absolutely agree with you. I spent some time on techzone yesterday. Great site!! Keep up the good "work" haha


  10. #85
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    beyond breaking even

    My site broke even almost immediately, but only because I could trade on my professional standing in the area covered by my site. I suspect it would take considerably longer otherwise. I'm still working on trying to get more than just pocket money, so I try not to dream of leaving the day job. (I think marketing is a key issue, as well as the wonder of your product).

  11. #86
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    Oh yes, start-up money was just my own programming time plus a few hundred pounds (for Americans, that's about [a few hundred dollars * 2])!

  12. #87
    SitePoint Guru Nick Carlson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by codejunkie
    what's with the run-on. Everybody's stating basically, the same point.
    Yeah, what is with the run on?? Everyone DOES seem to be stating the same point.
    ncarlson.net - a programmer's dystopia

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by codejunkie
    what's with the run-on. Everybody's stating basically, the same point.
    I noticed that, too. I think running a web based business can be a very long, lonely road, so when people get a chance to talk about how hard it is, they want to speak up. Like raising their hand and showing their badge. No put-downs intended. I have one of those badges, too. And I'm raising my hand.

    For the thread starter - wow, you are one tough cookie. I'm not shy about a workload, and regularly put in 80-100 hours per week on my two businesses. But if you were to throw in either my parents or my wife's parents, I'm pretty sure I'd end up going postal. And you're doing all this with what sounds like zero budget.

    Kudos to you for being the glue that is holding everything together. You seem to be well spoken and able to turn a phrase pretty well. You're at Sitepoint, which is a check in your favor to begin with. If you have the time, I would just read, read, read. Over the last weekend I discovered that Nintendo is a really smart guy who makes a good chunk of money and is always honing his craft. And in many of his posts he links to other sites that also have valuable information. I learned some valuable information from one of his sites this weekend. I learned something just reading this thread - something I hope to put to use in a new venture I've just begun working on.

    What's fun about the web is the monetary investment is almost nil to start. You can get software for free, coding help for cheap, and hosting for next to nothing. The only barrier to the big bucks is an idea and diligent effort.

    You seem like a great gal, and your soon-to-be-husband is lucky to have you (which is offset a little by also having to have your parents....). Here's hoping you can find that one idea that'll launch you into financial freedom!

  14. #89
    SitePoint Zealot toograffic's Avatar
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    If you love to write as much as you say you do, and you're actually good at it (remember, William Hung loves to sing, but it doesn't mean he can!) invest in a few books on copywriting for search engine optimization. Then join all the SEO (search engine optimization) forums you can and learn all you can, while offering your services - in a non-spam like way, of course. There are a lot of web designers/developers that can write code that is just beautiful, but they can't write properly optimized content to save their lives. Well written content that gets the message to the visitor and is attractive to the search engines is worth a lot, especially in very competitive businesses. A few good paragraphs can mean the difference between being on the first page of search results and winding up on page fifteen.

    Here's a link to a well respected SEO professional, Jill Whalen, and her book on writing for search engines:
    http://www.highrankings.com/seo-writ...source=hometop

    I am not affiliated with her at all, except that I have been a member of her forum and several others she is on, and I get her newsletter. She knows her stuff! There are people making good money writing good copy, so it might be worth a shot!
    The two most common elements in the universe are hydrogen
    and stupidity. - Harlan Ellison
    Retirement Communities and Senior Housing Options
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  15. #90
    SitePoint Enthusiast
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    Overall, I would have to agree with what most of the responses have said... there's no quick fix, but with some hard work and dedication, it can lead to some side cash and in some cases, primary income!

    That being said, I don't know if you have that kind of time, so my question for you is, how are your poker skills? Online poker is all the rage these days!

    Corey

  16. #91
    SitePoint Enthusiast
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chromate222
    moto, I absolutely agree with you. I spent some time on techzone yesterday. Great site!! Keep up the good "work" haha
    Yeah Techzone is a great site but it looks like it would be a full time job at least. You must surely have help with it?

  17. #92
    I hate Spammers mobyme's Avatar
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    Build on the skills you already have

    The internet is a great way of letting people know about what you can already do, it is an audience of millions. Everybody has skills in demand somewhere, it's all about selling yourself. My skills are nothing to do with the actual web but having a website has given me an introduction to more business contacts in the last two years than I made in the previous twenty through conventional media, and at a fraction of the cost. Build your site and they will come. I think I pinched that from somewhere?

  18. #93
    SitePoint Member
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    From your letter I understand you need money...sell pills...If you need help let me know, I have a list of links (SEO) that can get you started, everything for free too.
    Investment $30 per year or less (buying a domain and hosting) plus your time...
    People here are not very helpfull it seems and very discouraging, it is not such a complicated business. Knowing the truth and a lot of hard work.
    I started two years ago and it took me 2 months to achieve income, but I have experience in computers and Internet, I was never an affiliate and I wish I was, I am an affiliate manager and I get to know many affiliates and help them to earn more money (I get a percent from their percent).
    Allan Clark
    Affiliate Manager
    Brand Pills.com
    All Pills.net

  19. #94
    SitePoint Member
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    Hi,

    I have learn that the fastest and easiest way to make money is with PPC, like
    google. - Search for a topic you are intrested of, - get affiliation with company,
    - buy a good domain ( keyword ) - redirect your domain to your affiliatelink,
    - sign up with google, - research for good keywords ( maybe invest in a program )
    Secret is bid no more than $0.05 for every keyword and get targeted clicks!
    Thats it (-:

    Well it is not easy - motivation - concentration - research and research ...

    Reg
    Alex

  20. #95
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    Hi,

    If you have no experience of website building, if not hire someone doing this, you can
    affiliate with an existing company, invest in a domain and redirect it to your affiliatelink, learn to advertise with PPC, set up an google account, why not several companies in your nich? and while you learn more - get money, you can start building your own nich - with your affiliate link on your website and on a domain you already have traffic to....

    Reg
    Alex

  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by bugalugs
    Yeah Techzone is a great site but it looks like it would be a full time job at least. You must surely have help with it?
    Yes I have an entire team helping to keep TTZ running. They're scatter all over the world. Computers are a hobby for many people and I get asked all the time if I need help running the site. It's because I have so many people helping to keep TTZ running, I am able to put in just 2 to 4 hours a day of "work". I can even walk away from it if I want - the site pretty much runs itself.
    Last edited by Moto; Feb 15, 2005 at 22:33.

  22. #97
    Webwellwisher Robert Warren's Avatar
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    "Making money on the Internet"

    I may be repeating what others have said, but what the heck.

    Asking "does anyone make money on the Internet" is a little like asking if anyone makes money on roadside billboards, or on advertising in general. The mentality behind the question is the same as the one that says that you'll get lots of women if you're wearing the right kind of suit; it reduces every principle of ethical business to the level of a confidence game.

    The Web is a very, very powerful tool for business - if you're using it in a way that respects the nature of the medium, and if you remember that it hasn't made the normal rules of business go away. You still need to provide a service, one that creates real value for a real market of real people spending real money. If Web-based marketing happens to complement that service, then you can "make money on the Internet".

    People get into trouble when they confuse the Web with a big ATM machine, thinking that all they have to do is push the buttons in the right order and BOOM, fifty-dollar bills pop out of the CDROM. They try to start "businesses" that produce nothing, create nothing, deliver nothing, instead just shuffling other peoples' stuff around; that was the whole dot-com mentality. Of course they go broke and so people blame the technology rather than accepting the fact that their "business" was a stupid idea to begin with.

    Don't "make money on the Internet". Start a business. A real one, one that creates and delivers actual tangible value to a real market. Then investigate how best to leverage the strengths of the Web to the advantage of you and your business.

  23. #98
    SEOChat has too many ads Protoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Warren
    Start a business. A real one, one that creates and delivers actual tangible value to a real market. Then investigate how best to leverage the strengths of the Web to the advantage of you and your business.
    Dang. Well said captain.

  24. #99
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    I might agree with the comment that perhaps you should forego the big wedding, but that could be heartbreaking for a hopeful bride! Assuming you have some web design / development experience, here are some ways I have manage to earn a little cash on the side and not have my side work consume my life:
    - Focus on getting small, concise projects. These may not be "portfolio pieces" but get in, get it done, get out projects usually lack the time consuming pitfalls of longer-term, larger projects. If the project is not too large, you're less likely to run into issues where a critical deadline falls during the week that the day job is crazy, you're coming down with something, and friends from out of town visit! Besides, the higher profit margins are always in the small projects. And, since most dev companies pursue only larger contracts, small projects are easier to find.
    - Do work for non-profit orgs, and give them hefty discounts off your regular fees. The difference is your "donation" to the organization, which is tax deductible. Just be sure everything's on paper - anything over $500 must be documented (in the US). They get a quality site for cheap, you get a tax write-off.

  25. #100
    SitePoint Member
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    Amazing. So many ideas, so much great advice. I love it! Thank you all so much for taking such an interest in someone so new.

    Because of all of the helpful posts, I now have a focus and direction...writing. I had forgotten that I used to make a couple bucks in high school writing essays and debate papers for college kids. (One kid paid me with Burger King! lol) Please don't smack me for being unethical...I was sixteen.

    I have become fond of the link that Anat provided...holy cow! I have just been writing about everything I can think of on breaks and lunch in a notebook I bought. My next step is to wrest control of the computer from my fiance and get it into a file to submit. So far, I've only had time to submit one and just today I received approval for my first article! I called it "Getting the Most From Cellular Customer Service" I figure that since I have been a customer service representative for a cell phone company for almost 2 years now, that would make me somewhat of an expert. Go me!

    I am looking into everything suggested to see what pieces of whose suggestions I can put together to see what will fit my personality, skills and free time. All of you have been truly helpful and I deeply appreciate it.

    Thank you again from the bottom of my heart--if you are interested, I will keep you posted on my progress in this thread.

    ~Breelyn
    (savingforwedding)


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