SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    366
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Is it still necessary to provide a CSS alternative?

    Browser usability question here. How relevant are non-CSS browsers today?

    I've almost finished a site that is a complete CSS design, so to provide a non-CSS alternative I would essentially need to recode the entire site.

    I know that some people still prefer to offer a fall back option for older browsers, but is that really necessary anymore? What is the marketshare of such browsers? It has to be incredibly low.

  2. #2
    Non-Member Egor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I wouldn't bother redoing it all in tables. Let them suffer form the plain text content and maybe add a <h1 style="display: none">Update your browser!</h1> so only they will see it.

  3. #3
    SitePoint Wizard megamanXplosion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    1,099
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    *agrees with mstwntd*

    If you crafted your HTML and CSS correctly (including the CSS with the @import rule) then the older browsers will still be able to see all of your content and use it without any problem. I would add a message like mstwntd mentioned, try to explain to them that they should download an updated version of their browser. Use CSS to hide that message. Anyone using Netscape 4 or an equally-old browser and anyone using a browser without CSS will see the message if you @import the CSS file. Don't continue to bend over backwards for someone who is too lazy or stubborn to spend 30 minutes of their time every 3 years to upgrade their browser.

  4. #4
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    366
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by megamanXplosion
    If you crafted your HTML and CSS correctly (including the CSS with the @import rule) then the older browsers will still be able to see all of your content and use it without any problem.
    Well, uh, not really. I actually took a look at it in Netscape 4 and it is horribly broken, with basically no way to fix it without significant work.

    I agree though that it probably isn't worth it to fix for such a small percentage of people, but I was interested if anyone had statistics on what percentage actually use those kinds of older browsers like ie4 and nn4.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy TheOriginalH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    4,810
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by paladin
    Well, uh, not really. I actually took a look at it in Netscape 4 and it is horribly broken, with basically no way to fix it without significant work.

    I agree though that it probably isn't worth it to fix for such a small percentage of people, but I was interested if anyone had statistics on what percentage actually use those kinds of older browsers like ie4 and nn4.
    So, split the CSS that "breaks" it in netscape to a file that you envoke using the "@import" rule (usually positional stuff). Providing the page is marked up semantically sensibly, it should work with styles turned off completely (NS users just get a basic version).

    Unfinished, and I haven't split off the NS bothering CSS yet, but check out www.mmaphuket.com in Firefox (or Opera) with styles switched off completely and you'll see what I mean.
    ~The Artist Latterly Known as Crazy Hamster~
    922ee590a26bd62eb9b33cf2877a00df
    Currently delving into Django, GIT & CentOS


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •