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Thread: Animation Size

  1. #1
    SitePoint Member
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    Hi,
    Can anyone please give me a few tips on how to make animations smaller file sizes? I sometimes need to have a lot of frames and I would be very happy if anyone could help me out. Everytime I make a slightly larger ad, it comes out to 50K.

    Thanks,
    Joshua S.




  2. #2
    Misfit
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    There are a few things you can do:

    1) In your graphics program save the image at a lower quality.

    2) Optimize your graphic(s) in your GIF program (IE: reduce colors, quality, etc).

  3. #3
    SitePoint Member
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    Hi,
    Thanks Justin, but Is there any way to keep as much color and quality as possiable while reducing file size?
    Thanks
    Joshua S.

  4. #4
    Misfit
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    Yeah, just import your .JPG file into a GIF program (such as GIF Movie Gear or Adobe ImageReady) and then re-save the image as a .GIF file.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Zealot cckrocks's Avatar
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    It does work to do this. The reason why it works is this: When you reduce a file sizee with jpeg compression, it reduces the clarity on the picture by blurring colors together and this lends to a smaller file size. When you reduce the file size with gif compression is reduces the number of colors on the pallette. By compressing with jpeg first, you have blended to fewer colors, and then you reduce the # of colors with gif. However, it can lend to very distorted pictures, and you are usually better off using just one type of compression for your pictures. Jpeg for larger pictures that need to maintain a lot of colors, and gif for small pictures, icons, or anything that needs to retain it's clarity. It helps dramatically to start your graphics off right by only using a 216 color of less pallette, as your image won't be distorted so much when you try to compress it.
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