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View Poll Results: how do YOU pronounce it?

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  • S. Q. L.

    17 77.27%
  • seequel

    5 22.73%
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    cd /pub; more beer diacono's Avatar
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    ok, i know you can pronounce it both ways... but how is is generally pronouced?
    DIEGO MOORE

  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard TWTCommish's Avatar
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    Bottom of the page: http://www.mysql.com/information/index.html

    "The official way to pronounce MySQL is ``My Ess Que Ell'' (not MY-SEQUEL). But we try to avoid correcting people who say MY-SEQUEL. "

    That said I usually "spell it out" with acronyms - I don't say "As-puh" for ASP, I say "eh-ess-pee" - WAP is the one exception - I say it as a word.

  3. #3
    Grumpy Mole Man Skunk's Avatar
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    mySQL is pronounced "My Ess Queue Ell" but I'm pretty sure SQL is normally pronounced Sequel.

    A quick search dug this up:
    History


    The history of SQL and relational databases traces back to E.F. Codd, an IBM researcher who first published an article on the relational database idea in June 1970. Codd's article started a flurry of research, including a major project at IBM. Part of this project was a database query language named SEQUEL, an acronym for Structured English Query Language. The name was later changed to SQL for legal reasons, but many people still pronounce it SEQUEL to this day. IBM published many articles in technical journals about it's SQL database language, and in the late 70's two other companies were started to develop similar products, which became Oracle and Ingres. By 1985 Oracle claimed to have over 1000 installations. In the late 80's and early 90's SQL products multiplied and became virtually the standard for database management in medium to large organizations, especially on UNIX and mainframes.
    Interesting

    Looks like there is no rule for normal SQL - but mySQL should be pronounced as above.


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