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  1. #51
    SitePoint Zealot ChrisCarter's Avatar
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    Hate to come into this so late, but here's my thoughts (from a long time MySQL admin and heavy SQL Server admin):

  2. #52
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    r937's Avatar
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    that just about says it all, chris

    except you forgot to mention that de..
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
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  3. #53
    SitePoint Zealot ChrisCarter's Avatar
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    Heh, I have to apologise for that! Accidentaly clicked submit when a client walked in!

    Here's where I was going, before I posted my abrupt non-comment-

    Hate to come into this so late, but here's my thoughts (from a long time MySQL admin and heavy SQL Server admin):

    I hate to see so many people succomb to the marketing hype from both sides of the line (FOSS and MS). I'm not sure when precisely IT became so black and white to people, but I think some of you who call yourselves experts need to reevaluate how YOU evaluate a product as "better". I've been in this business for awhile and have never really found too many cases where I can unequivically call an application better than another across the board.

    Here's an example:

    "SQL Server is faster than MySQL"

    What kind of speed are we talking about here? Startup times? INSERTs? UPDATEs? SELECTs? There is no "perfect way" to build a database, it depends on where you want to make your optimizations.

    In my experience, MySQL is about as fast as you can get for SELECT statements. This isn't suprising when you look at how the database works, how the query optimizer works, and the features you sacrifice for this speed. The only database I've seen work faster is that hardware-based one by Terradata (I believe that's the company) where the execution paths are actually burned into the bios of the computer.

    Now, that doesn't mean that "MySQL is faster than SQL Server", it means that MySQL is faster than SQL Server at SELECT statements. Depending on the type of application you are writing, this may be exactly what you're looking for. However, if you have an application that requires heavy load, MANY concurrent connections making INSERTS and UPDATES quite a bit, you will probably want to go with a database that's got a bit more under the hood, ie SQL Server, Oracle, or even PostgreSQL (those who would doubt Postgres - try it).

    You don't take a Truck out on the race course, and you don't take a Ferrari into the mountains.

    As for which will be more valuable in the marketplace? I'd say learn them all, don't narrow yourself to one particular platform. The way we develop applications is going to significantly change over the next 5 years, and building a strong foundation based on multiple technologies will pay off the best.

    P.S. I HATE Transact-SQL. I'm eagerly awaiting Yukon with the hopes that MS has managed to match PL-SQL's maturity.

  4. #54
    Woof! Woof! elel1138's Avatar
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    What about Firebird? I walked into it recently and I really like it; however, I didn't use it yet in a serious application.

    Does anybody have experience with it?
    Leszek Leszczyński
    www.hazelsoft.com
    --- Real programmers don't document. If it was hard to write,
    it should be hard to understand. ---

  5. #55
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    I'd have to agree that MSSQL is the way to go. As other have stated, it's price is extremely competative against Oracle and IBM platforms and the hardware that is required to run it, as well as the knowledge is less by a considerable amount.

    As for MSSQL vs MySQL, I've developed in both. I've developed countless projects using MySQL and PHP, and countless projects with ASP and MSSQL/Access, as well as MSSQL and python, and python and MySQL.

    Here's how it stands. MySQL IS NOT A REAL DBMS! Sure, it's great, free, and really, really, fast. Inserts, updates, etc..are probably faster, but there's not the same extent of data consitancy checking that a real DBMS does. It doesn't have hardly any foreign support for the things that really matter. I work at an organization. We operate about 75 to 100 servers. Right now I'd say about 80% of those are running linux. Our whole management system currently runs off of ASP and MSSQL, we are now converting it all to Python, but keeping the MSSQL. All authentication for over 30,000 users is all done by MSSQL. We are slowly phasing out of windows but as one co-worker said...We will ALWAYS keep that windows box, running that MSSQL because it works so good, and does anything and everything we ask it to. You can't even begin to imagine how hard some simple things in MSSQL are to do on MySQL, when you actually need to do them.

    I'd agree...if your building a very small website, want cheap hosting, go for MySQL and php. MySQL works great for small projects, but I honestly wouldn't lean on it to support a large corp. project. As the traffic goes up, and the requirements, it just can't cut it.

    As for cold fusion, yuk! Stick to Python.


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