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  1. #1
    SitePoint Enthusiast
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    Well even though I've been desing web site for about 3 years now I still don't get the Unix and NT thing. All the site I currently do are NT whats the different between it and unix. From what I've came to figure out it seems like you can do a lot more stuff on your site if your using UNIX but like I said I'm lost in this area. I know nothing if someone could just run through the basics with me it would be greatly apprcaited I thank you all who can help me with this I'm sure it's pretty complex and kind of had to explain in a message form but anything would work. Thanks again for all your help!!!

  2. #2
    Irritability Defined
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    OK, some fundamental differences (and guys, no flaming please).

    NT costs about $300-600 per licence/copy, and if you want to run things like SQL Server or Cold Fusion on NT it will cost you a lot of extra money. ASP is the pre-installed (base) web language for NT/Windows 2000 systems and it's a pretty powerful server-side language. NT can support other server-side languages like PHP and Perl. Obviously NT comes from Microsoft and has been in existence for the last 13-15 years or so. However, the web server installed on NT (Internet Information Server) came along about 6-7 years ago.

    Unix comes in at least 10-15 different variants (including Linux and its own various distributions) and is completely free (though with some versions like RedHat you pay for technical support). Unix supports server-side languages like Perl, PHP, etc. and you have the flexibility to choose different 'web servers' to run your sites. The most common web server is Apache.

    Basically Unix and NT are different platforms to run your sites, and they specialise in different server-side languages. If you run plain HTML sites, neither will offer an advantage over the other one; the ultimate choice will depend on whether you like NT or Unix/Linux, as well as the choice of server-side language.
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  3. #3
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
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    You can install Apache on NT...

    Besides the cost Unix tends to be alot more stable and hog less resources than NT.

    When working with these two systems it is important to remember that Unix is case sensitive whereas NT is not.

    Unix is also easier to manage remotely than NT. For alot of things on NT you need to email your provider to have them done, on Unix you can usually do them yourself.

    What NT does have is usability if you're actually sitting infront of it and it has easier support for more user friendly databases like Microsoft Access.
    Chris Beasley - I publish content and ecommerce sites.
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  4. #4
    ********* Callithumpian silver trophy freakysid's Avatar
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    Linux is a *type* of Unix. There are many *nix flavours. Most Unix operating systems are proprietory just like Win NT. The University of California, Berkley developed an open source version of Unix of which there are many BDS (Berkley Development Software) derivatives (FreeBDS, NetBDS, etc). Then along came Linux, a version of Unix designed to perform (well) on the Intel 386 processor.

    Basically, unix was *the* mid-strength (ignoring the big iron such as mainframes) multi-user server operating system long before Microsoft had ever worked out how to rip-off (very poorly) Apple's Macintosh interface for a stand alone PC OS (let alone true client/server/networked computing). That was back in the days when the only wires sticking out of the back of a PC went to the power socket and "networked" computing was done by dumb terminals connected to (generally) unix servers.

    So NT is a very recent new commer to the world of client/server and distributed computing. Ignoring any Win NT vs Unix debates, one fact is that Unix operating systems have been around for an eternity relative to the recent arrival of NT.

    Unix was the multi-user, client/server, networked computing "paradigm" around which the internet was built. I only installed and started playing around with Linux on a PC at home a few weeks ago. And, having started in programming learning C++, I can now say that I am starting to grock certain things about C++ because I realise they have a Unix heritage. The same is true of the internet. Once you start to become a little familiar with Unix you start to see the much of the architecture of the internet is based on the Unix way of things.

    The open source philosophy can not be ingored in any debate about Unix vs NT. But there are others more knowledgable and experienced than I who may have something to say about it.


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