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  1. #1
    SitePoint Zealot
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    When to stop bugging a prospective client?

    A gentleman found my listing in the Yellow Pages and inquired about my web design services. We had a nice chat on the phone, did a needs analysis, and I sent him a proposal.

    Since then I've got his voice mail twice, eventually I did connect with him but he didn't have time to chat. He said he'd call back but he never did. Finally I called again and got voicemail.

    In this scenario, when do you give up? I don't want to lose a sale because I'm not persistant, but I get the feeling if I was in his shoes, he's probably not calling because he's not interested.

    Your thoughts?
    Paul Larson
    Creative Arc, Inc. - Minneapolis Web Design
    http://www.creativearc.com
    ArcLog: Resource for running a web business prime beef

  2. #2
    SitePoint Enthusiast
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    I would call one more time (may take you many times to get him, but I mean one more successful call) and say something to the effect of 'I just wanted to make sure I didn't miss your call'. Say it in a way that doesn't make you sound as if you're disorganized. Good luck.

    -Rob

  3. #3
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy
    beley's Avatar
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    Be honest, tell him exactly what you told us and just be forthright. Say something like "I don't want to keep calling if you're not interested in our services. We would love to help you develop your company website but understand if you choose someone else. Would you like to meet to get this project rolling? Yes, good. No, Okay, thank you for your time. Feel free to call if you ever need any help."

    Something like that anyway...

  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy
    beley's Avatar
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    Oh, and send a thank you note either way...

  5. #5
    SitePoint Wizard LiquidReflex's Avatar
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    Did you ever talk to this potential client face to face? This is a good way to gain a "relationship" with the client. Instead of doing an analysis over the phone, arrange for a meeting to sit down and discuss their needs. This puts a face to your business and shows them that there are people involved. It also shows that you are making an effort to make them feel comfortable choosing you to do their work. Then, after they received your proposal, if you were not able to get a hold of them over the phone (never leave more than 2 messages), stop by to see the client (if it's a business open to the public ... don't stop by their house) and see if the client would be available to discuss the proposal. If they don't have time, try to set up a meeting time when they are available. You are much more likely to get a meeting if you are there than if you just call them. And if they are not interested, you'll get a more straight forward answer face to face than a "safe" phone call. Either way, thank them for their time and opportunity and send them a thank you note once you get back to the office.
    Kevin Hauge : Modern Leaf Design : Follow Us on Facebook
    Client Axis v.08 - client / project management script

  6. #6
    One website at a time mmj's Avatar
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    Here's a good rule you can follow:

    Keep bugging a prospective client until it' no longer worth your time.

    Calculate how much it is costing you for the time it takes to bug the client.

    Calculate how likely the client is to hire you. This will decrease if the client becomes annoyed at you, so as soon as you feel the client is annoyed at you, it probably isn't worth it anymore.

    You need to do everything that you can, as long as it's worthwhile to you. Otherwise, you'll always be wondering what would have happened had you tried just a little bit harder...
    [mmj] My magic jigsaw
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