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  1. #101
    Danny
    SitePoint Community Guest
    Good article, straight to the point and some things I hadn't considered before (mouse-gestures).

    @Corey
    That's actually a pretty interesting idea, especially for galleries/portfolio's. I think watermarks are still the nicest way, but I'll investigate that one further, if you don't mind. Thanks.

  2. #102
    sparts
    SitePoint Community Guest
    wait wait wait why are u trying to rightclick in the first place!

  3. #103
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by corey
    Another solution I've played with is slicing. Even for large websites, the process can be automated to make it viable. Split images into 10-20 squares/rectangles before displaying them. While it doesn't protect them from being downloaded, it discourages it from petty thieves since they'd have to reassemble the pieces together. If you're crafty, you can actually cut the image into pieces that overlap and position them correctly with HTML/CSS. When a perp downloads them and tries to reassemble them he/she's got a much harder task.
    The problem with this one is dial-up visitors will have a much longer wait for the page to load--- while 50kb of 1 image is the same as 50kb total of 10 images, you have to have your browser ask the server for each and every one. For some people that's a long wait. You only have to ask once for a single image-- the reason css-sprites are encouraged in place of multiple menu tab images.

  4. #104
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    A screen capture easily bypasses image slicing making it pointless to do that.

    If you don't want people being able to copy an image at all then don't put it on the web.

    If you want to protect an image on the web then save it as the lowest possible resolution that still looks acceptable and embed a watermark in the image identifying either the owner or the web site. That way anyone trying to use the image will find that trying to remove the watermark lowers the resolution to the point where the image is unusable for anything and using it with the watermark advertises where they stole it from.
    Stephen J Chapman

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    <input name="html5" type="text" required pattern="^$">

  5. #105
    OLDODLOLD
    SitePoint Community Guest
    okay so like yeah disabling right click can be annoying to users, but with the advent of newer web technologies which allow web developers to create there own context menus. In this case you want to disable it.

    There is no way to protect your source code if it is a web app. Simple rule of thumb. if its online, then you cant protect your source. sensitive data or source should bve on the server side neways. not on the client.

  6. #106
    a-guy
    SitePoint Community Guest
    I like how inconsistent your arguments are - in one section you state how it's easy to circumvent right-click (making your point moot) but how annoying it is when you can't *go back* without right click (ignoring how darn easy it is to *go back* the way I do: alt+left arrow key).

    Even funnier is how I am a proponent of free & equal web access, but your petty & pointless (seeing how easy it is to circumvent) arguments encourage me to piss you off.

    So, what's the difference between closing a door tightly & a vault-quality lock? A closed door discourages FEW but not all, a vault-quality lock discourages MOST but not all. Nothing's perfect.

    Thanks for convincing me to disable right-click.

  7. #107
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    I like how inconsistent your arguments are - in one section you state how it's easy to circumvent right-click (making your point moot) but how annoying it is when you can't *go back* without right click (ignoring how darn easy it is to *go back* the way I do: alt+left arrow key)
    The arguments aren't inconsistent. The users are.

    The nerds can find and take anything they want.

    Grandma just gets frustrated and tells you where to shove it. She's never tried clicking random keys to discover what alt+left arrow does. Hell, until your post, neither have I. Nice tip.

    Yeah, breaking the back button is pretty annoying. Don't do it. Otherwise the Web Standards Evangelical Movement will send its storm troopers to your house in the middle of the night and bring you to a stadium where the frustrated grandmas and computer illiterate can spend the entire month beating you with their shoes. And I'll applaud.

  8. #108
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    Many of you will have encountered this puzzle previously, but for those who haven't, solving it is a way to relax during long coding sessions. It also illustrates the futility of trying to hide source code.

    http://www.drpeterjones.com/hidden/hidden.php (A study in how to hide web page source code.)

    James
    Last edited by jamesicus; Feb 20, 2009 at 10:33. Reason: corrected format

  9. #109
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    There are a number of people who use the context menu as their primary navigation method on their computer. Those people would have the menus turned off in their browser and probably don't know the shortcut keys (just as most of those who try to disable right click overlook the equivalent keyboard shortcut - to press the key immediately to the left of the right CTRL key - which brings up the contextmenu without even touching the mouse).

    In any case I don't personally care what other sites try to disable right click because I have my browser set to ignore such code and the more other sites get people annoyed at them the more people that are likely to end up on my site where I don't do such things to drive visitors away.
    Stephen J Chapman

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  10. #110
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    The only advantage with disabling the right click is you can't let people copy your content with traditional method. But there are too many disadvantages of this...even it's better to let people copy paste your message as long as they tell their website visitors the source of that article (which is your website) so why should you disable the right click? Just look at all the big sites, nobody disable the right click.

  11. #111
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruddy View Post
    The only advantage with disabling the right click is you can't let people copy your content with traditional method.
    Anyone trying to copy your content wil have disabled the option for pages to block right clicking in their browser.

    Since it is under your visitors control whether they allow such scripts to run or not such a script cannot be used for the purpose of trying to stop them doing something.

    The only time disabling the context menu makes sense is where you are substituting your own and since not all browsers allow you to do that you have to provide an alternate way to access the options in your custom menu that doesn't rely on it replacing the context menu.
    Stephen J Chapman

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  12. #112
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    i used to disable right click but realized that it did get annoying. even for myself when i went on my site.

  13. #113
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baybossplaya View Post
    even for myself
    So why don't you just change your browser configuration to ignore those scripts if you find them annoying? The only people "no right click" scripts annoy are those people who haven't yet configured their browser properly to ignore those scripts - usually newbies, many of whom rely on that menu for navigating between web pages.
    Stephen J Chapman

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    <input name="html5" type="text" required pattern="^$">

  14. #114
    Chris
    SitePoint Community Guest
    You talk about removing "needless whitespace" to obscure HTML, but there are many tools out there, such as HTML Tidy, that will clean these up instantly and effortlessly.

  15. #115
    Steve
    SitePoint Community Guest
    Disabling right-click is actually very useful. While you can encode your javascript source code to 'hide' video source, browsers like Firefox allow visitors to right-click to bring up the page-info page. This page has a 'media' tab that shows you all sources of media on the page.
    While it is not fool proof, the purpose of disabling right-click is to discourage the casual visitor from stealing content. This is usually 99% of visitors.
    Thus, DO DISABLE Right-Click - it works!

  16. #116
    Danny
    SitePoint Community Guest
    I have used "disable right click" scripts many times, and in reading your article, I find you have many excellent, common sense points. Thanks for the great article (it is amazing how easily I can get "zoomed in" so to speak, and lose sight of some of the very simple, common sense issues you raise here.) - Thanks
    p.s. - to the last poster: it seems to me that the 99% of users who would be thwarted by disabling right click, are certainly not a technical threat capable of stealing your content/code and using it in some meaningful or financially lucrative way.

  17. #117
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    One additional point: I have been a web designer for over 10 years now, and I have no problems with anyone (individuals/freelancers anyway) "stealing" my code. The beauty of the Internet is that there is so much free, Open Source information out there; and sharing of information on Forums, Usergroups etc. As far as stealing images, anyone can simply do a "Screen Capture" or "Print Screen" and paste it into an image editor -- even novices do not "need" the right-click/save image to get a photo.

    The simple truth is that the Internet has changed our civilization in ways we cannot yet even perceive. The cost of Software is already headed in a frightening direction. I know fully well that there will be some real exceptions to this next statement and I do not wish do discount anyone's hard work or right to profit from it, but for the most part, the vast majority of Information Technology (in all its forms: OS Creation, Coding, Web Design etc) MUST REMAIN (or become in many cases) FREE.

    The majority of the world cannot afford the literally THOUSANDS of dollars to obtain software at major corporations' surreal pricing, enrollment in courses with equally exorbitant pricing, or even the books (at $49.99 and higher - for one book, one subject) to self teach.

    So what? Why is that my problem or important? -- Because the Internet and Information Technology has brought us to a vital crossroads in our civilization: this technology has already dramatically changed the way information, news, beliefs, and ideas are disseminated throughout the world (look at recent and ongoing Iranian Revolution for one small example), and it will continue to grow in doing so. The individual's ability to use it effectively (seo and all) is crucial. We must adopt a communal (as in sharing knowledge, not Cold War Russian Communism) attitude as we move forward. If we choose the path of Proprietary, Elite "Ownership" of information, we will all regret it that choice is the very near future.

    The long term cultural and global evolutionary implications here superlatively supersede any short term financial considerations of corporations or individuals.

  18. #118
    SitePoint Addict zipperz's Avatar
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    Good article.

    It really annoys me when I try to open a navigation button with a right click in another tab and it says “right click not allowed” or what ever.

    Fist off like I want to steal your worthless 400px no resolution indoor pic of your cat?

    Or your 1999 HTML code that is 800 pixels wide and sticks to the left of my screen.

    It is like someone is trying to lock up a $5 bicycle with a flat tire and missing handle bars with masking tape.

    If I wanted your worthless pics I would just do (prt sc- paste) and if I wanted your worthless code I would (view source)


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