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  1. #1
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    SATA VS IDE (Hard Drives)

    I'm looking to buy an new hard drive and I am pondering weather to buy one with Serial-ATA or a regular IDE one. I have a motherboard that supports SATA, so i'm all set. I'm wondering if its worth the extra money to buy a SATA hard drive or not. A couple Western Digital ones I was looking at were only $20 more than regular IDE hard drives. What do you guys think? Is it worth the extra cash?

    Thanks,

    -Ben

  2. #2
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
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    If you have applications that require pure speed and bus mastering capabilities (ability to copy between drives without CPU intervention, etc...) then SATA is definately an Advantage.

    Think of SATA as more in line with SCSI performance compared to IDE that is the boost you will see. Not only that but SATA supports cables of up to 1 Meter to give you complete more breathing room in configuring your machine or having external storage.

    The only disadvantage is you need a controller for each drive. If your motherboard supports 2 SATA channels, then that is all you can have while you can put four IDE devices on 2 channels. However for most workstations and with drives of 200 GB or more, this should be more than enough space.
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    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
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    From what I've seen SATA is the future, but it isn't there yet. Something about the current implementation with it with the hard drives themselves makes it not reach its full potential

    Anyways I've seen those who understand such things recommend waiting 6 months to a year for better hardware. I've also seen them recommend buying an SATA compatible mb now (that also obviously supports IDE) so when the drives mature you don't need a new mb.
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    SitePoint Wizard
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    Thanks for your replies. I have checked my motherboard manual and I do have 2 SATA slots, so I should be fine there. One more thing, if I use a SATA as my main hard drive can I still have a regular IDE hard drive connected so I can access data on it? Or does this depend on what my motherboard supports? Appreciate your help.

    -Ben

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    >> One more thing, if I use a SATA as my main hard drive can I still have a regular IDE hard drive connected so I can access data on it

    Yes you can. Any motherboard that has SATA will also have IDE sockets.

    See http://www.poweroid-video-editing.co...hard_disks.asp and these tips I've written on optimising hard disks: http://www.bestpricecomputers.ltd.uk...e/perform2.htm

  6. #6
    ..back with a vengeance... Ingoal's Avatar
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    Yup !

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    SATA v IDE-5

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben
    I'm looking to buy an new hard drive and I am pondering weather to buy one with Serial-ATA or a regular IDE one. I have a motherboard that supports SATA, so i'm all set. I'm wondering if its worth the extra money to buy a SATA hard drive or not. A couple Western Digital ones I was looking at were only $20 more than regular IDE hard drives. What do you guys think? Is it worth the extra cash?

    Thanks,

    -Ben
    Hi:
    I would stay with IDE-5 7200RPM 8mb cache, MDT or WD's.Why?
    SATA has not been tested by microsoft fully as IDE-5, Microsoft has said there is no native SATA support by them ,like a driver(they are working on it), They have said the future operating systems will have ATAport or close and this will have SATA drivers and IDE drivers in it and of course SCSI support. Since SATA has not been tested by Microsoft and streamlined for every module in Windows XP, 2000, ect, CRC errors would go exponential and slow down performance, another thing to rememeber, most benchmarks are at best inaccurate and worst grossly inaccurate, "wintune" by old pc mag is the closest in many measurements,its simple, fast,small download, and easy to use. Wait till MSN releases its new operating system with it tuned to SATA transfers,
    The prices will be much lower on SATA and it will operate better,My IDE-5's are cool and smoke 7200 RPM 8mb SATA drives.
    Gamma1

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by W. Luke
    If you have applications that require pure speed and bus mastering capabilities (ability to copy between drives without CPU intervention, etc...) then SATA is definately an Advantage.

    Think of SATA as more in line with SCSI performance compared to IDE that is the boost you will see. Not only that but SATA supports cables of up to 1 Meter to give you complete more breathing room in configuring your machine or having external storage.

    The only disadvantage is you need a controller for each drive. If your motherboard supports 2 SATA channels, then that is all you can have while you can put four IDE devices on 2 channels. However for most workstations and with drives of 200 GB or more, this should be more than enough space.
    Thats a text book response look at the facts though,,lol
    Specifications:

    Seagate Barracuda SATA V: ST3120023AS
    - Capacity: 120GB
    - Discs: 2
    - Spindle Speed: 7,200 RPM
    - Average Seek Time: 9 ms
    - Interface: SATA/150
    - Maximum Internal Transfer Rate: 570 Mb/sec
    - Sustained Transfer Rate: 27 - 44 MB/sec
    - Idle Acoustics: <2.4 bels
    - Size: 26.1mm x 101.85mm x 146.56mm (LxWxH)
    - Weight: 1.199lb
    Features:
    - 7,200 RPM
    - 350Gs of Non-Operating Shock
    - 8MB cache buffer
    - 3D Defense System
    - SoftSonic FDB motor

    Note the transfer rate sustained 27-44 MB/s, thats very close to ATA-5
    Max internal transfer rate is .57 GB/s , probably in Raid 0 and smallest stripe, further, its now Public Knowledge , that Disk Drives are the "slowest" part of the computer system,the slowest !! Buying SATA will cost more money and for equal performance, you pay more money just to switch drives, no real increase, FACTS, here we go !! Memory
    reads and writes up to 7 GB/s, When is the Disk Drive Business, Western Digital,Maxtor,Seagate,Hitachi and the rest of them going to get out of molasses and speed up to the rest of the system, they are so slow, the little old lady from pasadena passes them up, with her walking cane.
    They are a joke in speed, and everyone knows it except them, further, they should get a reality check, the normal pricing for hardware is not more expensive then the operating system, they and others need to lower there greed and increase there speed!
    One other fact , if you like speed ,want to know about speed, on Disk Drive look to SCSI Fibre Channel, they cruise at over 12.5 GB/s in a loop with other SCSI's of the same design and features , this was brought about by by Gene "the machine" Amdahl, whose first group of SCSI's was set up at Stanford University and was certified at 1 million bytes per second. I dont recommend trying to get SCSI's, the fastest SCSI's available are from very small companies, where the company is owned and operated by the owner , whose is an electronic engineer of distinction, these SCSI's have the processor incorporated with the disk drive and video and audio tables permanently on the disk drive, the SCSI's that run at 25,000 rpm's were previewed in Chicago, Il about 20 years ago, from these small companies, quite successfully too as the true fastest drives.
    Last edited by gamma1; May 15, 2004 at 19:54.

  9. #9
    SitePoint Enthusiast eod's Avatar
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    I've had a heck of a lot of trouble from my SATA drive. I eventually get it fixed with some work. The speed is great, it seems to be a lot faster than my IDE hard drives. The only thing I have against it, is the trouble with installing Linux on it.
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  10. #10
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    7200 RPM 8MB is top's for Desktop's !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben
    I'm looking to buy an new hard drive and I am pondering weather to buy one with Serial-ATA or a regular IDE one. I have a motherboard that supports SATA, so i'm all set. I'm wondering if its worth the extra money to buy a SATA hard drive or not. A couple Western Digital ones I was looking at were only $20 more than regular IDE hard drives. What do you guys think? Is it worth the extra cash?

    Thanks,

    -Ben
    Hi Ben:

    Check this out by anandtech :

    http://www.anandtech.com/storage/sho...tml?i=1795&p=7

    There is no advantage in SATA over IDE-5 7200RPM 8MB, I have
    MDT-drives IDE-5 7200 RPM 8MB, these are faster than Caviar by WD
    and Cheaper, they have been streamlined for speed by shutting off acoustics , ect, Further , same 1 year warranty, MDT fixes broken
    Drives for all disk dive companies as an outsourcing service, they are the largest independent service of this kind,these drives are recertified and I have had no problem with them and they are 30-40% cheaper,
    I got mine thru pcmicrostore.com, thru pricewatch,, warren ,leo and karen do a real good job with customer service, the prices have gone up slightly since I got mine, however, the saving is still there.

  11. #11
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    put your windows files on a SATA hard disk,
    and it'll go really faster!

  12. #12
    SitePoint Author Kevin Yank's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamma1
    Hi Ben:

    Check this out by anandtech...
    The article you quote is more than a year old, and dates back to the days when SATA drives were simply ATA drives with converter circuitry added to support the SATA interface.

    Current SATA drives are designed from the ground up to benefit from the new interface.
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  13. #13
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    Current SATA drives are designed from the ground up to benefit from the new interface.
    Does that mean new features have been added to SATA ?

  14. #14
    SitePoint Guru Marubozo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zillah
    Does that mean new features have been added to SATA ?
    Well, talk about bringing back a very old topic. SATA has come a long way since the nearly 2 years ago this was posted. Anyway, SATA was/is being rolled out in a series of versions, with each adding more speed. So, technically, yes new features are being added to SATA, but in a sense it is the same technology, but just able to do a little more.

    I've been running SATA since nearly the beginning (early 2003 for me) and have two drives running in a RAID 0 array. Not a single problem, no data errors, no problems with windows and drivers, nothing. But anyway, I love it. Data transfers are quite fast with virtually no CPU overhead, and the extremely thin wires are a custom PC builder's dream.

    It has come a long way, and as the technology continues to advance with increased speed and availability, you can be sure your system will probably benefit from running it.
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