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  1. #1
    SitePoint Enthusiast Brendon S's Avatar
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    My quote was $4,000, my competitor was $400 - and I won the job!

    Howdy

    Hope you are well.

    I had an experience yesterday that I'd like to share, because I know how hard it is to get your pricing right when pitching for web work.

    I went to see a prospect for the third time. This meeting was to give her our proposal for her web site.

    As I sat down the client said to me, "I had another quote. It was for $400."


    I knew I would win the job

    As soon as she said that, I knew I would win the job. Even though the price I was about to quote was $3,960! I'll explain why later, but first I'll go through what I did.

    I gave my pitch. I said to the client, "Okay Barbara, we've covered all of your problems and you've seen how our proposal will meet those problems. Would you like us to get in and make a start?"

    "Yes please. Who do I make the check out to?"

    ===================================

    In previous posts I've given examples like this before, but this one is new and improved (!) and I thought you guys find find a sliver of interest in it.

    Our team (I employ 5) have regular training sessions. Today we made it about why we won this job. Here are the reasons:

    1. Another client referred us Barbara as a lead. This is a huge, huge advantage to us. When this happens we will always get the job. Always. Barbara has, like most people, no idea on how to judge the suitability of a web developer. She is relying on her friend (our client) for advice.

    2. I had three- (3) meetings with Barbara. First meeting: All I ever do in the first meeting is ask question after question after question. These sort of questions:

    "So Barbara, what do you see as your main problem with setting up your web site?"
    (Her answers were cost, lack of technical know how, lack of knowledge on how to market the site.)

    "What do you want and need the web site to do?"
    (Her answers were to show her product, make her sales and make it easier for her customers to contact her.)

    "When do you need the web site working by?"
    (Her answer was "As soon as possible." )

    Second meeting: A simple confirmation meeting to ensure our proposal will meet Barbara's needs (we also do the second meeting because we know that if we do a 'confirmation' meeting, we make more sales).

    Third meeting was the pitch.

    This is what I did in the pitch. It's a simple 4 step process.

    1. I reiterated Barbara's problems.

    "Okay Barbara, your web site is down. You said you need the web site running by Tuesday at the latest."

    2. I agitated the problem a little.

    "Yes Barbara, having your web site down is no good at all. (Barbara's web site had been removed by the previous owner of the business) It doesn't look very professional at all if people come to visit and get a "Page not found" page." That will be costing you sales and money."

    3. I told her what the solution could be.

    "Okay Barbara, 2 things we can do here. Number 1 is put up a simple "Site coming soon" page with your contact details on the page. That way, at least visitors will see something and be able to contact you.

    Number 2 is to drop everything we have on and get our designer working on this project within minutes of walking out of here. We could have an initial draft design to you by tomorrow afternoon.

    We could have the entire site up and running and making you sales by Monday afternoon.

    4. I got Barbara to agree. (This is easy!)

    "That would fix that problem, wouldn't it Barbara? You said Tuesday for the site and we can get it up by Monday. Would that be good?"

    I did that with each and every problem that Barbara identified for me (and I added a few that she didn't know about such as,

    "Barbara, you know nothing about web site marketing. As part of our service we provide you with a simple manual called "How to market your web site." Would that help you?" )

    ================================

    I knew Barbara's problem. I recommended my solutions. I had her agree they were good solutions.

    There is almost no way that Barbara could reject my proposal now.
    • I gave her the solution to all her problems.
    • I had her agree they were great solutions.
    • I then told her the cost for those solutions.
    • I completely and utterly removed any risk to her
    • I asked her to buy.
    Why should she believe me?

    Because I was referred by her friend (I mentioned that friend as a happy client quote a few times) and I gave Barbara the names and numbers of happy clients (she didn't call them. Me giving them to her seemed to be enough).

    I showed her examples of other work we had done and related each aspect to what we would do for her - and I quantified the benefits as best I could. "If we do this, it's been our experience that you will sell 25% more."

    How did I remove the risk?

    I told Barbara that if the design wasn't up by Monday afternoon, it was free.

    I told Barbara that if the design wasn't exactly what she wanted, then she gets her money back.

    And I then put those 2 things in writing.


    The design was done in two- (2) hours

    The design was done in two- (2) hours and Barbara loved it. We are also putting on a newsletter script, optimising the site for the search engines, putting on the shopping cart, editing the copy Barbara has given us (need to do that for the SE) and then making the site live.

    Barbara is already thrilled with what we have done and we'll exceed her expectations on this job. Then we'll get more work with editing the site, maybe marketing the site, etc.

    And all because of those 4 simple steps!


    There is one- (1) other thing I did today

    I took 2 tickets to a casino show and dinner around to my client who referred me Barbara.

    The tickets and voucher were in an envelope with a sincere hand written card saying "We take great pride in providing a quality service and we really appreciate you recognising this. Thanks so much for helping us to grow our business - you're wonderful!"


    And then my client said these beautiful words.

    "Oh by the way Brendon, we've just sold this business. We've bought another one and we'll need a web site for that one as well."

    P.S: Just in case you are trying to figure out the industry the client is in, it's management rights of holiday resorts.

    =================================

    Why I knew we had won the job............I think!

    Now this is the bit where I'll try and explain why I knew we had the job once Barbara told me the quote of the competitor.

    # 1: Every single time that has happened, we have won the job with a higher quote.

    # 2: My thinking is this. The prospect just wants to be reassured that going with us is the right thing. they want to know we won't cut our price back just to be the same. And I really push the fact that "To do that Barbara we need to do this, this and this. As you know, this costs about $800 alone - so I'm not too sure how this other guy is going to do the entire site for $400??"

    ==================================

    Defintely the last bit!

    Our quote for $3,960 represents great value for money for the client. And that's our client's perception as well.

    Would the $400 quote have been a better solution for the client? Not in the client's opinion.

    Hope that helps you in making that next sale. Good luck!

    Kind Regards

  2. #2
    lean mean coding machine cosmo's Avatar
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    Wow, this was a great read.

    Yeah its alway important to stick to your guns when it comes to price competition.

    Thanks a lot for sharing your experience with us, Brendon!
    Luthfur R. - Web Developer
    PHP Lite.com - Professional PHP Scripts and Web Applications
    Calendar Express 2 - Web Based Calendar and Event Publishing System

  3. #3
    ☆★☆★ silver trophy vgarcia's Avatar
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    Wow that was a good story! Sounds like you'll need to add an addendum to your kit soon!

  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard bbolte's Avatar
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    Fantastic article! (wow had already been used twice...)

  5. #5
    SitePoint Addict Shawn Weeks's Avatar
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    A question.

    Say you didn't judge the client's financial position quite right - they didn't want to spend $4k on a website. They already set a figure in their mind and regardless of all the marketing and sales pitches you threw at them, they still wouldn't budge. It's common for individuals (companies as well, I've learned) to set a price early on and stick to it.

    If you couldn't budge them after weeks and weeks of negotiations, would you lower your quote, or bid them farewell?

  6. #6
    SitePoint Enthusiast Brendon S's Avatar
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    Thanks!

    You know how modest I am (!!!) but I think the next post I stick on here is the best post I've ever written.

    It's such a perfect example of what I try and articulate regarding selling the value.

    And although most of it is taken from an article I wrote a couple of days ago, I think the start and the end that I have just added make it a perfect illustration..

    It's called "This could be the most important post you ever read."

    Hope you enjoy it!

    Regards

  7. #7
    Santos L Halper Zenith's Avatar
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    My $0.02

    Nice post. Like you said here, two things that made this so much easier task it might first see:
    1. Referrer
    2. The ridiculous price gap

    1. With referrers you have always 10 times better chances to close any kind of deal - wheter it's a small or big. Usually the problem with new clients is trust: how can you make the person trust that you can make good work, reliable solutions and serve his/her needs. Because all other companies say those same phrases and offer solutions for same business problems. More ignorant the client is of the technical or marketing issues easier it is for other companies to make her/him eat bullsh... They can offer solutions that aren't real solutions, and be "not honest" in other words. With referrer you have beaten others already, only competitior for you is
    a) another company who also has a referrer
    b) the price - if you trust yourself too much or underestimate the client. One should never try to pee in the clients eye and rise up the price even though the deal'd be "safe on paper". Bigger the deal is more likely the customer is willing to trust on the friend who has referred your company.

    2. This was a very typical case of these "troubled times"... oh dear, I've seen these few times. One example: we made a bid and first calculation was around 100 000. Then we cut that down because we had some estimation of the money customer was willing to pay: the ending sum was something like 60 000. And we knew we might be in trouble with that money because the task was big, but due to bad sales situation overly it was worth the risk. Well we didn't get the deal: someone had offered 40 000, and the lowest price was somewhere round the 25 000 (we figured that out, not sure but it had been much lower). Think of those gaps!

    By the way, if you wonder how I know other bids: when making a bid to a institution which is funded by EU (european union) or government you are allowed to know the winning bid. The exact amount, because it's all public information. Anyway, when sales don't run and you have very little work companies are sometimes making ridiculous offers only to get new clients and some work. Like here, 400 for 4000's work. Like the gaps I presented few rows above show. The problem when bidding for government funded clients is that they cannot refuse smaller bids - at least they need very good reason. If the bid is low enough and they can somehow justify to inspectors it was "too low", that is only case they can take yours instead. It's tricky, so there you must play your bids a bit lower. Also they have tight budgets so if your bid goes $1 over the budgeted money you are out.

    This went offtopic now What I was saying: when you have good background referrals and you can give arguments and show the another bid is ridiculous and made only to leech customers you can win. Like mr. Sinclair just stated. Altough I think he can win anything

    -Z-

  8. #8
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    Great Post!

    True story from my meeting with a client today to deliver a proposal:

    I walk in the door and greet my potential client. She smiles and says she is eager to hear my proposal. I tell her I am eager to present it to her and I really look forward to working with her. She says she looks forward to working with me as well and her friend, my client, had nothing but great things to say about me.

    I handed her the proposal, very neatly bound. She says "deal". I laughed as she didn't even read it, or the cost. She says she is going to go with me nomatter the price. She liked the referral, she liked my suit, my professional attitude and finally, the neatly bound proposal. That scored me the job.

    I had even quoted her a little higher, as her friend was a real haggler, so I figured she would be as well:-)

    $5000 job. $1000 yearly maintenance contract & hosting.

    The proposal took me 6 hours to write. not bad for a days work!
    Twin Dreams, Inc.
    www.twindreams.com - Professional Website Development
    www.sharky.com - Sharky's Grilling Forums!

  9. #9
    busy Steelsun's Avatar
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    Great post - I have a guy I am training in marketing for my company (busines services - investigations & consulting) who I will have read this - you put into words better than I have been.

    Also your rewarding former clients that referred you a new client is great - we do that quite often - in fact I have one client I do all kinds of little jobs (that I would normally bill $50-150 for) that I don't charge anymore (he calls about every 2-4 weeks for one), since he has referred us and continues to do so, so many others.

    mucho pos rep for that post.
    Brian Poirier
    SunStockPhoto: Stock Photos, Fine Art Photos, Event Photography

  10. #10
    The knight who said ni! RockyShark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Weeks
    A question.

    Say you didn't judge the client's financial position quite right - they didn't want to spend $4k on a website. They already set a figure in their mind and regardless of all the marketing and sales pitches you threw at them, they still wouldn't budge. It's common for individuals (companies as well, I've learned) to set a price early on and stick to it.

    If you couldn't budge them after weeks and weeks of negotiations, would you lower your quote, or bid them farewell?
    What I have done in the past when this has happened is break it down into 'phases' according to what they can spend now.
    "Okay, for $x we can to this, this and that now, and then in another 6 months or so we'll look at phase 2 and do this, that and the other..."
    That has worked for me in the past. I haven't lowered my quote, I've just spread the cost.

  11. #11
    Santos L Halper Zenith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharky
    Great Post!

    True story from my meeting with a client today to deliver a proposal:

    I walk in the door and greet my potential client. She smiles and says she is eager to hear my proposal. I tell her I am eager to present it to her and I really look forward to working with her. She says she looks forward to working with me as well and her friend, my client, had nothing but great things to say about me.

    I handed her the proposal, very neatly bound. She says "deal". I laughed as she didn't even read it, or the cost. She says she is going to go with me nomatter the price. She liked the referral, she liked my suit, my professional attitude and finally, the neatly bound proposal. That scored me the job.

    I had even quoted her a little higher, as her friend was a real haggler, so I figured she would be as well:-)

    $5000 job. $1000 yearly maintenance contract & hosting.

    The proposal took me 6 hours to write. not bad for a days work!
    Did you go on a date with her after the meeting

  12. #12
    SitePoint Wizard Lil_Red's Avatar
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    Personally, I would've turned you down. Whenever a salesman pitches to me the way you described, I immediately tune him out.

    1) I know what I need and don't need someone to tell me in a condescending manner that they know my needs better than I do.

    2) I think salesmen who use the scare tactic "if .... fails then ..." If you buy my product that won't happen. This is not professional. It's just preying on people's fears. Men especially like to use this one on women. I've seen it at car dealerships, appliance stores, etc.

    3) It's generally a lie when salesmen say "our design will drop everything just for you" which turns me off to them.

    btw - your pitch sounds word for word like those get rich quick schemes on tv or those seminars that part people from their money.

  13. #13
    ☆★☆★ silver trophy vgarcia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Weeks
    A question.

    Say you didn't judge the client's financial position quite right - they didn't want to spend $4k on a website. They already set a figure in their mind and regardless of all the marketing and sales pitches you threw at them, they still wouldn't budge. It's common for individuals (companies as well, I've learned) to set a price early on and stick to it.

    If you couldn't budge them after weeks and weeks of negotiations, would you lower your quote, or bid them farewell?
    Well, you could always cut the non-essential features of a project in order to save some money, if the client really has a number in their head. Look at the project. What's essential, and what's "nice to have"? Cut some of the "nice to have" features that would take up a lot of your time and cut the price of the project accordingly.

  14. #14
    Wanna-be Apple nut silver trophy M. Johansson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lil_Red
    Personally, I would've turned you down. Whenever a salesman pitches to me the way you described, I immediately tune him out.

    1) I know what I need and don't need someone to tell me in a condescending manner that they know my needs better than I do.
    I'm perfectly sure that Brendon neither tells his clients anything in a condescending manner, or that he tells them he knows better than they do. What's more important, though, is you claim that you know what you need and don't need in every client-provider situation? If you go to the doctor, do you tell him that you need 45mg of Hoglificipam and a little bit of surgery? 99% of clients don't know what they need. If they did, they wouldn't be looking for a professional to do it.

    Anyway, you might or might not like Brendons approach. I'm not particularily fond of his "putting on a show" when selling a domain name (described in the book), for instance. However, the fact of the matter is that this approach is tremendously successful (Brendon get 95% of the jobs he pitches for), especially in getting return customers.
    Mattias Johansson
    Short, Swedish, Web Developer

    Buttons and Dog Tags with your custom design:
    FatStatement.com

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    Non-Member mmi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lil_Red
    Personally, I would've turned you down. Whenever a salesman pitches to me the way you described, I immediately tune him out.
    In a way, I can understand what you're saying. But just from the way you've worded this, it sounds like you're being a little close-minded. I think we're all familiar with the kind of sales tactics and "attitude" you're describing, but is that really what Mr. Sinclair is doing?

    Things aren't always what they seem to be. (How's that for brilliant analysis? ) I'd suggest the reason the "get rich quick schemes on tv or those seminars that part people from their money" are effective is they seek to mimic the kind of genuinely helpful and enthusiastic approach advocated here.

  16. #16
    SitePoint Wizard samsm's Avatar
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    Brendon seems to do a number of things well. Finding out what the client needs, creating a plan that surpasses their expectations, and keeping up with referrers to name a few. Those are some important things!

    That said, I have to agree with Lil Red, Brendon sounds a bit like a car salesman. Perhaps it's due to a limitation of his summaries. However, I think it takes a special sort of person to say: "That would fix that problem, wouldn't it Barbara?" Again, I agree with Lil Red here. As soon as someone starts using "As you know, NAME,..." and rhetorical questions on me, a red flag pops up. Simply put, I don't like it when people put words in my mouth (even if the words were already there!).

    There are a number of great aspects to this pitch. Asking the questions, staying in touch, creating the package that the client really wants, offering it to the client in a clear manner, following up on your guarantees, keeping up with old clients/referrers, etc. However, I think the attitude conveyed here requires a special person to pull off and a lot of perceptiveness to check how the client responds to your style.
    Using your unpaid time to add free content to SitePoint Pty Ltd's portfolio?

  17. #17
    Santos L Halper Zenith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lil_Red
    Personally, I would've turned you down. Whenever a salesman pitches to me the way you described, I immediately tune him out.

    1) I know what I need and don't need someone to tell me in a condescending manner that they know my needs better than I do.
    Yes you do, but very often people don't even know they could increase their sales (for example) with a website. They don't know the possibilities web can offer, or they might know "I need a website" but have no idea how to get the benefit. That is called selling, salesman's task is to offer solutions and tell the client they need your products. You gotta be a bit agressive because you can never sell anything if you start saying "well you probably won't even need anything..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Lil_Red
    2) I think salesmen who use the scare tactic "if .... fails then ..." If you buy my product that won't happen. This is not professional. It's just preying on people's fears. Men especially like to use this one on women. I've seen it at car dealerships, appliance stores, etc.
    Imho you didn't understand this point either (or then I didn't). He wasn't saying "pay from us or!" - he was only pointing out that the other offer was so low they could not give the client the service what is needed. Where he is right, you don't have to be a rocket scientist to know that you cannot get anything with $400, maybe one meeting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lil_Red
    3) It's generally a lie when salesmen say "our design will drop everything just for you" which turns me off to them.
    btw - your pitch sounds word for word like those get rich quick schemes on tv or those seminars that part people from their money.
    (from now on "you" meaning "people overly" to avoid mixing things up )

    Well of course it's a lie - sometimes. If you say to a client "We're good and effective people and get our work done in time" and the project for some reason goes messed up (like they sometimes do), have you lied? No. I think Brendon knows his people can do the design and work which actually does cover all the client needs. Sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't. This is again something you need to do to sell things. You have to offer images to people, tell that your company is best and you are the best and nicest buddies there are. There is always someone better than you in everything but the point is: can he sell his services as well as you can?

    Imho there is one very good reason why Brendon has succeeded: he can sell. In this world nice people finish last - no matter how good programmer or designer you are you can never get success with being always nice. There is a limit of course when you are too agressive, but you need to have the selling attitude, offer solutions, be creative and put the idea in the client's head that he needs something. Most new firms have this problem and that is one very big reason they never go bigger. You gotta have one person in your company who knows how to do "the trick" - to tell your clients how well you really can do things. People aren't going to come to your place and ask it, they need to be told face to face.

    -Z-

  18. #18
    Non-Member mmi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zenith
    Imho there is one very good reason why Brendon has succeeded: he can sell. In this world nice people finish last - no matter how good programmer or designer you are you can never get success with being always nice.
    Just one opinion (and I'm not much of a salesperson), but I think he sells in large part because he is nice.

    As an aside, the Durocher quote about "nice guys finish last"

    http://www.bartleby.com/59/3/niceguysfini.html

    was misunderstood. Those were two separate sentences.

    http://collection.nlc-bnc.ca/100/202...erson/nice.htm

    Punctuation can be important , and sportswriters aren't the most sophisticated journalists.

  19. #19
    Wanna-be Apple nut silver trophy M. Johansson's Avatar
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    Actually, Brendon says that nice guys finish first:
    http://www.tailored.com.au/archive_m...chive_main.htm
    Mattias Johansson
    Short, Swedish, Web Developer

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  20. #20
    Santos L Halper Zenith's Avatar
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    Alright, the "nice people finish last" wasn't well said here. My point was even though Brendon is nice when selling - which he is - he also has to be a bit pushy and agressive and to get that idea of "I need that thing you sell" to the client's head. Brendon does same thing other "not nice" salesmen do, but he is polite, listens the client and most important he gives solutions that actually helps and wants to help the customer to get more money.

    My "nice people finish last" was referring to the fact people are nice in wrong way. If the client says "well I don't think we need a website, my neighbour hasn't got one and he's not bankcrupted" too nice people (= not salespersons) say "well ok, I'll be just leaving then". That's what I meant. You cannot give up and just state "well he didn't want anything and I was nice not to push". If you'd say "well have you thought about this and this and how we could offer you this and that bla bla bla" - yet nicely - you could get the job.

    In the end the people who are the most agressive sellers usually have the biggest car and houses. I know some companies which have made very nasty tricks to cash millions and millions from clients - they have done things the way they won't get friends but they've got millions and they still do. Alright they have tricked the client a bit to sell them an application and service they cannot practically change, but that's one tactic. Someone might think a porn business is not the way you want to get your dollars, some else thinks that's ok and earns millions.

    It's only a matter how you want to earn your money. I think no one here is a saint when you think the things you have done your life. We can of course dislike the way some people make their money (talking about those evil salesmen again) but if they make their living and give a job for 1000 other people and not breaking any laws it's then a question about opinions. Not whether it's good or bad business.

    -Z-

  21. #21
    SitePoint Enthusiast tmilovan's Avatar
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    I agree with Lil_Red.

    But I think that the way you sell is defined by your personality or if you wish charisma. So I believe it is because of his appearance, personality etc... that with his approach made him great salesmen.

    I (when I'm selling) do with 9 out of 10 sales and usualy outbid on about 50%.And I'm using entirely different approach. I'm very reserved, polite, unobtrusive and usually let clients draws his own conclusions.

    If I would try Brendon style It would be catastrophe, also I believe it would be equaly bad if he would try to use my style.

    I'm talking just about approach here, other parts of metodology are pretty much the same that I use.

    So my suggestion is: develop a style that is most natural for your personality, you have to have an air of credibility around you and that will be hard if you act as a person that you actually aren't.

    Sometimes you'll buy from the likes of Brendon, sometimes from the likes of me, it's about person/style combination, not just about style.

    Cheers,
    Last edited by tmilovan; Aug 15, 2003 at 10:27.

  22. #22
    Wanna-be Apple nut silver trophy M. Johansson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmilovan
    I (when I'm selling) do with 9 out of 10 sales and usualy outbid or about 50%.And I'm using entirely different approach. I'm very reserved, polite, unobtrusive and usually let clients draws his own conclusions.
    Hmmm, after what I've read in Brendons book so far, that's pretty much exactly what he does. The only moment when he takes a more offensive approach is when he is making the pitch, which is made after two meetings where all he does is basically asking the client questions.

    So my suggestion is: develop a style that is most natural for your personality, you have to have an air of credibilitty around you and that will be hard if you act as a person that you actually aren't.
    With the above said, this is excellent advice, unless you personality sucks, of course.
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  23. #23
    SitePoint Enthusiast tmilovan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M. Johansson
    Hmmm, after what I've read in Brendons book so far, that's pretty much exactly what he does. The only moment when he takes a more offensive approach is when he is making the pitch, which is made after two meetings where all he does is basically asking the client questions.
    To clarify

    It's not about the offensive approach that I think we differ.

    For example I would never call my clients by their first name (unless we know each other before) in our meetings.

    I would never force conclusions from my clients the way Brandon does )), I would never allowed myself to be so , let's say "suggestive" in my communication.

    Clients will never buy that kind of attitude from me

    That's what I was refering on.

    Quote Originally Posted by M. Johansson
    With the above said, this is excellent advice, unless you personality sucks, of course.
    hahaha

    Cheers

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    SitePoint Wizard LeoWebDesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M. Johansson
    I'm perfectly sure that Brendon neither tells his clients anything in a condescending manner, or that he tells them he knows better than they do. What's more important, though, is you claim that you know what you need and don't need in every client-provider situation? If you go to the doctor, do you tell him that you need 45mg of Hoglificipam and a little bit of surgery? 99% of clients don't know what they need. If they did, they wouldn't be looking for a professional to do it.
    I agree. When I am hiring someone to do something for me I want someone who:
    1. Knows more than I do
    2. Is professional
    3. Is very confident that they can deliver
    4. Can get results

    Otherwise I would do it myself. There is nothing wrong with telling a client what they need if you genuinely know it is in their best interest and you aren't just trying to "sell" them. In fact, they will respect you for it. However, your timing needs to be right or they will think "How can he tell me what I need? He doesn't even know the situation."

    What Brandon is doing is letting the client play themselves out before offering any advice. Even if he might know what they "need" after 5 minutes.

    Quote Originally Posted by M. Johansson
    Anyway, you might or might not like Brendons approach. I'm not particularily fond of his "putting on a show" when selling a domain name (described in the book), for instance. However, the fact of the matter is that this approach is tremendously successful (Brendon get 95% of the jobs he pitches for), especially in getting return customers.
    I think what helps in closing is confidence, at least for me. When you have been through the process a few times you can really let that show and even tell the client "trust me, I can help you get to where you want to be". It is working for me. Especially for referral clients, which I have been closing at a 98% rate lately.

  25. #25
    Wanna-be Apple nut silver trophy M. Johansson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmilovan
    To clarify[img]images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]

    It's not about the offensive approach that I think we differ.

    For example I would never call my clients by their first name (unless we know each other before) in our meetings.

    I would never force conclusions from my clients the way Brandon does [img]images/smilies/smile.gif[/img])), I would never allowed myself to be so , let's say "suggestive" in my communication.

    Clients will never buy that kind of attitude from me [img]images/smilies/frown.gif[/img]

    That's what I was refering on.
    Ah, okay. Yeah, I understand what you are saying. I could never do that either, at least not in the manner Brendon transcribed - I think it depends much on your ordinary way of speaking. Then again, I think the approach can be effective if you can fit it into your own style. I.e. I might say "If we don't optimize your search engine rankings, you'll most likely drop beneath your competitor, which I assume is something you don't want?" (last part said in a joking, ironic, tone) so that the client can respond to by laughing and saying "yes".
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