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  1. #1
    SitePoint Enthusiast prasanth1's Avatar
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    How to avoid repeat content?

    By repeat content I mean something like a book review for example. How can I write a book review without repeating content already published somewhere? Does repeat content affect the performance of my website? Any way out?

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    Let me put it the other way round. If you are writing a book review, why would you want to "repeat content already published somewhere"? What content are you planning to repeat?

    Perhaps you mean that you want to quote extracts from the book in your review. If so, that's completely legitimate, and it won't cause you any problems - provided the quotes are short, and you still provide plenty of original content.

    But if you mean you want to copy large amounts of content from other reviews, that's another matter. It's called plagiarism, and it will quite possibly get you into trouble.

    If I have misunderstood your question, please clarify it.

    Mike

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    You can use some tool check repeat content. I thinks you can check google webmaster tool for repeat title and meta tag

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    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    If you write a genuine review of your opinion of the book then you are unlikely to duplicate what anyone else has said.
    Stephen J Chapman

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    I think yes it afect your site , you can try to check your site with copyscape and look if there is someone with the same conent.
    Hope this helped to you

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    Hello Prasanth1,

    what you are referring to is probably primarily concerned with the way Google and its robots look at content.
    The quidelines are rather clear: you should avoid copying content (from other sites or sources, but also from you own website or blog.
    When you intend to re-use conent, you should rewrite it with different words and composition of sentences. The algorithmes with which content is scanned is quite sophisticated.

    Yes, the rule is that Google will penalize you for copying content.

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    Quote Originally Posted by solarpro View Post
    When you intend to re-use conent, you should rewrite it with different words and composition of sentences.
    Yes, the rule is that Google will penalize you for copying content.
    You're missing the point. Changing a few words here and there does not alter the fact that it is plagiarism. If you are writing a book review and you have nothing original to say, better not to say it. Presenting someone else's ideas in re-hashed copy does no-one any good.

    Whether Google will "penalise" you is another matter. As I said earlier, it is perfectly legitimate to quote small passages from the book you are reviewing (provided the quotes are relevant to your review). There is no evidence that Google will downgrade a site just for doing that.

    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikl View Post
    You're missing the point. Changing a few words here and there does not alter the fact that it is plagiarism. If you are writing a book review and you have nothing original to say, better not to say it. Presenting someone else's ideas in re-hashed copy does no-one any good.

    Whether Google will "penalise" you is another matter. As I said earlier, it is perfectly legitimate to quote small passages from the book you are reviewing (provided the quotes are relevant to your review). There is no evidence that Google will downgrade a site just for doing that.

    Mike
    Hello Mike,
    I doubt that, although I recognize that there are two aspects or dimensions to the issue.
    Yes, copying a review means that you commit plagiarism. But I was responding to the original question, which seemed to address the other dimension.

    But it is good that the OP is well aware of both issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by solarpro View Post
    I doubt that, although I recognize that there are two aspects or dimensions to the issue.
    Yes, copying a review means that you commit plagiarism. But I was responding to the original question, which seemed to address the other dimension.

    But it is good that the OP is well aware of both issues.
    Perhaps Prasanth1 could come back and clarify what type of content he is proposing to duplicate.

    Mike

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    SitePoint Wizard webcosmo's Avatar
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    Quoting parts of the text isn`t a problem. Duplicating someone else's review is plagiarism. Simple.

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    SitePoint Enthusiast prasanth1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikl View Post
    Perhaps Prasanth1 could come back and clarify what type of content he is proposing to duplicate.

    Mike
    Hi Mike, I was not referring to the idea of duplicating content. I was only saying that most book reviews on the Internet reiterate the same ideas and thoughts. That's why the question, how to avoid repeat content.

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    Quote Originally Posted by prasanth1 View Post
    I was only saying that most book reviews on the Internet reiterate the same ideas and thoughts. That's why the question, how to avoid repeat content.
    I see. Thanks for clarifying that. I'm not sure I agree with you. But if you are worried about repeating the same ideas and thoughts, I wonder why you want to write reviews in the first place? I wouldn't try to write a review unless I had something new and interesting to say.

    Mike

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    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    When I write a book review I deliberately do not search out anyone else's review of that book. My reviews are always based on my opinion of the book - I take notes as I read the book. If I happen to say something about the book that someone else has already said then it would be extremely unlikely that I would use exactly the same words. Also since I always have at least a dozen points in my review the chances that more than one or two of them duplicate what anyone else has to say is very unlikely.

    I can't see how anyone who writes reviews the way I do would ever have duplicate content issues. Duplicate content issues could only ever arise if you read other people's reviews of the book before writing your's - and then you are no longer reviewing the book.
    Stephen J Chapman

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    SitePoint Enthusiast prasanth1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by felgall View Post
    When I write a book review I deliberately do not search out anyone else's review of that book. My reviews are always based on my opinion of the book - I take notes as I read the book. If I happen to say something about the book that someone else has already said then it would be extremely unlikely that I would use exactly the same words. Also since I always have at least a dozen points in my review the chances that more than one or two of them duplicate what anyone else has to say is very unlikely.

    I can't see how anyone who writes reviews the way I do would ever have duplicate content issues. Duplicate content issues could only ever arise if you read other people's reviews of the book before writing your's - and then you are no longer reviewing the book.
    Brilliant work! Chapman. You have showed me how to write a book review, thanks a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by prasanth1 View Post
    By repeat content I mean something like a book review for example. How can I write a book review without repeating content already published somewhere? Does repeat content affect the performance of my website? Any way out?
    Check the content before publishing using any copyscaping or pliagarism checker for any duplicate content, thereby you can find what content is published where, on which date and you can rewrite them. Yes repeat content definitely affect the performance of your website, search engines like google will not give weightage to the duplicate content and the links you publish, your SERP results will be affected

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    Content marketing has come down in a big way ,Mr Prashant, google and other major search engines have changed their algorithms to crawl over simple but unique content. You idea of having to repeat reviews or opinions on a particular topic ( which maybe repeated) will not hold value unless there is a new perspective on what you re trying to convey. Think from the point of view of a reader, if you feel u will be repeating content avoid writing that piece altogether!

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    SitePoint Wizard DoubleDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by felgall View Post
    When I write a book review I deliberately do not search out anyone else's review of that book. My reviews are always based on my opinion of the book - I take notes as I read the book. If I happen to say something about the book that someone else has already said then it would be extremely unlikely that I would use exactly the same words. Also since I always have at least a dozen points in my review the chances that more than one or two of them duplicate what anyone else has to say is very unlikely.

    I can't see how anyone who writes reviews the way I do would ever have duplicate content issues. Duplicate content issues could only ever arise if you read other people's reviews of the book before writing your's - and then you are no longer reviewing the book.
    I try and take the same approach with everything I create. (If you read or listen too much to what others are doing or saying, you will only parrot them!)

    Excellent advice, Felgall.


    Debbie

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    No, no, no repeated content is always bad. If you want to summarize a book, or a shorter text, you should read it several times and then write it in your own words. Only in this way will have value for you. Repeating the content is highly penalized by Google, so it is not worth publishing texts copied in large quantities. Of course, quotes from time to time are acceptable, but interspersed with original and unique content.
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    SitePoint Enthusiast prasanth1's Avatar
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    Well said DoubleDee! In fact I was only referring to parroting others opinions and views in my thread. You got my point! Having said that I should say that it becomes difficult for the IM to desist from parroting at times. Do you agree with me?

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    If you are going to write something fresh you should worry about it. We all do it over and over again. There is only so much you can talk about a subject. You have to take a different angle and write something new. Idea may not be original but the content would be and therefore, you shouldn't have a problem.

    As for your question of parroting others, almost every subject is already well covered on the internet. For example, if you listen to love songs, they will all say similar things "I cannot do without you" or "you are so beautiful". Still, every song that says these words are different from each other unless they stole each others lyrics. As long as you are not stealing you are alright. By the way, using one or two line well said phrase is not really stealing. It is quoting.

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    SitePoint Member Verum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikl View Post
    But if you mean you want to copy large amounts of content from other reviews, that's another matter. It's called plagiarism, and it will quite possibly get you into trouble.
    Just because I'm really nit-picky about this (since it is an area of my expertise), plagiarism is typically the termed that is used in an academic setting. In the context Prasanth is referencing, it would be called copyright infringement. Copyright protects the expression of ideas. That being said, fair use is a very common affirmative defense to copyright infringement. Fair use is determined off of a four part non-exclusive test that balances the the purpose and character of your use, the nature of the copyrighted work, the amount and substantiality of the portion taken, and the effect of the use upon the potential market. In a situation where you might be copying a review done by a company like Amazon there isn't really a market for Amazon's review, so fair use is quite expansive. I have no idea what the google impact is for your site on such an issue; my discussion is simply about the legal aspect of doing so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Verum View Post
    Just because I'm really nit-picky about this (since it is an area of my expertise), plagiarism is typically the termed that is used in an academic setting. In the context Prasanth is referencing, it would be called copyright infringement. Copyright protects the expression of ideas. That being said, fair use is a very common affirmative defense to copyright infringement. Fair use is determined off of a four part non-exclusive test that balances the the purpose and character of your use, the nature of the copyrighted work, the amount and substantiality of the portion taken, and the effect of the use upon the potential market. In a situation where you might be copying a review done by a company like Amazon there isn't really a market for Amazon's review, so fair use is quite expansive. I have no idea what the google impact is for your site on such an issue; my discussion is simply about the legal aspect of doing so.
    Thank you for clarifying those points.

    Just to add a note about fair use: I believe that concept applies mainly in the United States. In other jurisdictions, there are similar concepts, such as fair dealing, but the details might be different. You will know better than me what the differences are. I mention this because anyone reading this discussion would have to take those differences into account when applying your advice.

    Mike

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    SitePoint Member Verum's Avatar
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    Solid point Mikl. I am speaking primarily from a U.S. perspective, but there certainly are differences in other jurisdictions. Fair dealing under English law is much more restrictive than fair use.

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    I agree with many of them in the above discussion that if you are writing a review before reading everyone’s review then you content has approximately 10% chances of being duplicate. As it is possible that those two persons are having same views but it is not possible that they both use same selection of keywords to explain their views. And to check the duplicate content you can use Google webmaster tools or Copyscape.I think this might help you.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by creativeprojects View Post
    And to check the duplicate content you can use Google webmaster tools or Copyscape.
    Well, the original question was not how to check for duplicate content but how to avoid it when writing reviews. I think that question has been answered in some detail.

    But in any case, Copyscape would not necessarily work in this case. Assuming we are talking about user-submitted reviews, of the type you see on shopping sites like Amazon, any duplicate text is likely to be small compared to the page as a whole. Think of a typical Amazon product page, that might contain an extensive product description along with information about prices, availability, how to order, etc. And it would typically contain maybe half a dozen user reviews. If your own content duplicates, say, one paragraph of one of those reviews, then only a small percentage of the page as a whole will be duplicated, and that would probably not be enough to be flagged in Copyscape.

    Mike


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