SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    SitePoint Evangelist
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    438
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Git and license # and changelog

    I'm new to git. It looks great and I think I get the general process of making commits and adding tags for version numbers.

    My questions are:

    1. Do you make a commit every time you want to 'save' your work but only add a tag when you want to change the version number?
    2. Can you insert a version number automatically based on a tag? E.g. get git to find and replace {VERSION} with 1.6.14
    3. I can see the gitlog command can be used to generate a changelog. On github people tend to have a CHANGELOG.md or README.md file that is converted to HTML on their github page. Is the MD file something you create or github creates? Should your local README/CHANGELOG be .md format or something else?


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy
    wwb_99's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    10,652
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    1) I tend to make multiple commits for each little part of things I save -- you can do loads of neat things combining small commits but parsing out large ones is a *****.
    2) Yes but that is a job for a build server. A better approach is to let the build server "own" the tag and insert it in the right places. I'll note I very, very rarely use tags these days -- and when I do it is for one-off communication. Continuious deployment FTW.
    3) Typically you want the changelog to be a bit more human understandable than a raw commit log -- oftentimes you'll have a number of commits changing things back and forth in order to figure something out or fix a bug.

  3. #3
    Avid Logophile silver trophy
    ParkinT's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,343
    Mentioned
    192 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    @DrQuincy ;

    The general approach is to make your commits 'atomic'. That is very subjective (differs for each person) but - particularly if you are working as part of a group - you should remain conscious of how the git history will read (the results of a `git log` command). Depending upon the project, I often make commits at the end of a 'working session'. If those changes represent a little work on several features (or issues) I will use the `-i` flag to selectively break up my changes in to several commits.

    The tag in git is really just a different way to reference a commit. It is nothing more than a label.

    The accepted SOP on Github is to provide a README file for your project. The Markdown language is extremely popular - and Github even has their own 'flavor' - and that is how the README.md file can display in a formatted (HTML) manner.
    The same format is used in Github Gists.

    If you are new to git and have a Github account don't miss out the great "add-on" capabilities you get with your Github account:
    • An unlimited number of Gists that can be Public or Private (realizing "Private" just means they will not show up in SERPs, but you can share the URL with anyone)
    • Github Pages to "host" a website about each project
    • Wiki for each Repository
    • Issues tracking for each Repository
    • Enormous amount of Help Resources related to git and to Github
    Don't be yourself. Be someone a little nicer. -Mignon McLaughlin, journalist and author (1913-1983)


    Git is for EVERYONE
    Literally, the best app for readers.
    Make Your P@ssw0rd Secure
    Leveraging SubDomains

  4. #4
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy
    wwb_99's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    10,652
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One other thing -- you might want to check out bitbucket. It has a little less cache than github but a few more features (mercurial) and a better model with unlimited free private repos.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •