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  1. #1
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    How to Learn Doing it Right Way?

    Hello

    I am new to Sitepoint but glad to be here.

    I am self taught web developer. I do not have any computer science degree from university. I know HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, PHP and some Python. But I am having difficulties about being efficient. When I create a project, I am buried into files, folders, bugs and todoes. Because I am managing multiple projects at a time, I totally feel stressed and not in control.

    I see real programmers whom have computer science degrees use utilities like Git for source management. They use Unit tests for testing and other tools for Debugging in an easy and quick way. I am sure there are lots of other tools they have which help them stay safe and calm while they manage their projects.

    But because I do not have any computer science degree, I do not know how to do things in a right and efficient way. I just do it, in an organized way. It works but it burns out me, too.

    I Googled a bit and find some books from Amazon about Project Management but I feel intimidated. The tools and resources I found also very scattered which seems getting them together to create an organized routine is also requires another expertise.

    As a self taught web developer what can I do to learn doing things right way? Do I need a computer science degree or a course about programming? Can I learn the right way by Googleing or from books? If you can recommend, I will be grateful.

    Cheers

  2. #2
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    Hey javaxoty,

    I'm a self taught developer, too, so I know where you're coming from. I also know that feeling of drowning in disorganized stuff; backup copies all over the place, files from FTP copied to the desktop for editing... Not nice.

    By now, a few years later, I feel really comfortable with my workflow. No formal training involved. What taught me the most were jobs and internships at two small companies. It's incredible how quickly you can improve when you sit next to someone who knows how to do things for 8 hours a day.

    So if you have the time, get a job or internship somewhere. Don't worry about salary. Instead, make sure they know where you're coming from, and are willing to mentor you. I would even work for free for a few months, the things you learn will more than pay for the time you spent.

    If that's not an option for you for any reason, learn stuff by yourself. You're spot on with Git and testing, those two are definitely a must. For git, I have heard good things about http://try.github.io. For testing, I would try to find a book about the language/framework of your choice that covers testing, and work through it.

    Whatever you do, good luck

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by zank View Post
    Hey javaxoty,

    I'm a self taught developer, too, so I know where you're coming from. I also know that feeling of drowning in disorganized stuff; backup copies all over the place, files from FTP copied to the desktop for editing... Not nice.

    By now, a few years later, I feel really comfortable with my workflow. No formal training involved. What taught me the most were jobs and internships at two small companies. It's incredible how quickly you can improve when you sit next to someone who knows how to do things for 8 hours a day.

    So if you have the time, get a job or internship somewhere. Don't worry about salary. Instead, make sure they know where you're coming from, and are willing to mentor you. I would even work for free for a few months, the things you learn will more than pay for the time you spent.

    If that's not an option for you for any reason, learn stuff by yourself. You're spot on with Git and testing, those two are definitely a must. For git, I have heard good things about http://try.github.io. For testing, I would try to find a book about the language/framework of your choice that covers testing, and work through it.

    Whatever you do, good luck
    Hey zank,

    Thank you so much for your valuable suggestions. I also thought internship in a company but did get the courage for it. I will definitely search for a suitable company after your encouragement.

    Cheers


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