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  1. #1
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    Unhappy Do i need to learn javascript in order to work on HTML5?

    I'm new here, and i really want to learn how to create a website. but the problem is, I have no one to help and guide me in the right path. I don't even know where to start!
    I've currently just studied Basic HTML, and going off to HTML5, but i realized it has some sort of Javascript and Css in between. I'm really confused. can someone please tell me what I have to study, and Is learning HTML5 enough in order to create a website? If not, what else should i learn?

  2. #2
    The CSS Clinic is open silver trophybronze trophy
    Paul O'B's Avatar
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    Hi,

    Welcome to Sitepoint.

    You don't need JavaScript to code a website unless you are adding client side dynamic aspects to it. Html5 has nothing to do with javascript as such so you don't need to learn it all yet.

    Html4/5 are the structure by which content in your page is organised but you will need to learn CSS in order to display the content as you wish.

    html5 is an unfinished spec and often (wrongly) considered "cool" these days but in fact html4 can do most of what you need and will be around forever. html5 is changing and evolving so I would learn html4 first but keep an eye on html5 so that you know what's happening. Then make your own choice which to use.

    If you can afford the outlay then something like Learnable makes learning much easier. Also look at some of the Sitepoint books as they have some good introductions into html and css.

    Also have a look around the design forums sticky threads as there are lots of tips and links to get you started and when you have a specific problem with a coding question then you can ask in the forums if you can't work it out.

  3. #3
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    Steve Husting

  4. #4
    SitePoint Member johnlarase's Avatar
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    You should master the "basics" first, you can go to any websites that offer free tutorials about web development etc.
    A few sites that I knew of are w3schools and webmonkey.

  5. #5
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    HTML and CSS is enough to design simple website. once you get complete knowledge of HTML and CSS then you can learn java script to make your design advance and stylish. www.w3cshool.com is best website to learn basic about HTML and CSS.

  6. #6
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    Mikl's Avatar
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    Given that you are new to this field, you shouldn't focus on HTML5 - at least, not for now. It would be better to learn the two core technologies first: basic HTML (never mind any particular version) and CSS. Build one or two simple sites using those tools (just as a training excercise - you don't have to actually publish them) before you go any further.

    Once you are fluent in HTML and CSS, you can start thinking about Javascript, and also about the specific features of HTML5. But neither is essential for building everyday websites.

    Mike

  7. #7
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    Mikl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnlarase View Post
    A few sites that I knew of are w3schools and webmonkey.
    Actually, w3cshools has come in for some criticism in this forum. Several people say that the content is incomplete, misleading and very badly out of date.

    I've no personal experience with w3schools, so I can't say if those opinions are correct. But you might want to do a forum search to read what others are saying before placing any reliance on it.

    Mike

  8. #8
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    From what I've read, w3schools is good for HTML and CSS but is way behind in Javascript. The first few lessons on JS for example I've learned is years old and not even relevant anymore.

  9. #9
    It's all Geek to me silver trophybronze trophy
    ralph.m's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikl View Post
    Actually, w3cshools has come in for some criticism in this forum.
    Quote Originally Posted by djay80 View Post
    From what I've read, w3schools is good for HTML and CSS but is way behind in Javascript.
    http://www.w3fools.com/ points out more formally the deficiencies with that site.

  10. #10
    SitePoint Enthusiast Belsnickle's Avatar
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    You don't need to learn javascript but knowing it will make a number of things easier including, specifically, styling for legacy browsers as it turns out since you'll be able to add classes and count dom levels, etc that you would otherwise need a browser specific selector for and IE in particular is notoriously bad at selector support in legacy browsers with IE 9 only starting to add selectors for CSS 3 to count elements and IE10 actually having comparative support to the other modern browsers.

  11. #11
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    learn them from w3c

    http://www.w3.org/

  12. #12
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    The knowledge of HTML and CSS is good to design a simple website...But for the advanced website knowledge of java script is required...Although direct code of a java script queries are available on internet. copy the code and paste where it is required...

  13. #13
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    Mikl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anshulseo View Post
    ... direct code of a java script queries are available on internet. copy the code and paste where it is required...
    I know a lot of people do that, but it doesn't seem to me a good approach, especially for someone who is trying to learn web development techniques.

    If you simply copy and paste code without understanding it, you could get yourself in a mess. Even if the codes works in your site, you could find it very difficult to maintain or enhance the code later. Above all, it does nothing to help you learn the language, which was the original questionner's main objective.

    By all means study code samples that you find on the Internet. But do so to learn from them, not to blindly imitate them.

    Mike


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