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  1. #1
    SitePoint Zealot prashidi's Avatar
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    Essential Web Design Checklists

    This forum thread discusses the SitePoint article 'Essential Web Design Checklists' by Marta Eleniak.

    "Everyone sees things differently - in a literal sense! Marta explains the anatomy of vision and provides guidelines that Web designers can use to develop widely-percpetible and attractive designs."

  2. #2
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    What is being compared when you compare the colors in grey scale? I understand the contrast comes out but why? Why are two different colors reduced to essentially the same color in grey scale?

    I ask because I'm not a graphics artist and I have run into this very issue. I am a developer and I'm also slightly red/green color blind. I described this same process to the artist but I couldn't articulate the reason behind it. I think if I knew how to articulate it in say color theory, that I will not have such a hard time next time. Is it that the two colors have the same hue or something and the grey scale proves it?

    I know this is how they can test to see if animals are color blind or not. They train them to react to say a floor color differences. When two colors are the same essentially in grey scale, the animal acts as if there is no change in color because it looks like one shade of grey to them.

    What property of color causes it to generate a certain shade of grey in grey scale?
    Last edited by Buchanp; Apr 28, 2003 at 12:09.
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  3. #3
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    Grey scale used to get idea of colour blindness

    Reducing any colour design to grey scale is to mimic the fact that in colour blindness it is difficult to differentiate different colours (such as red from green which becomes grey from grey) but you may see which was a dark colour (red or green) as opposed to a light colour (red or green) as different shades of grey. It's an indication and a helpful one, but is not the same as having colour blind users comment on your design.
    Marta

    Quote Originally Posted by Buchanp
    What is being compared when you compare the colors in grey scale? I understand the contrast comes out but why? Why are two different colors reduced to essentially the same color in grey scale?

    I ask because I'm not a graphics artist and I have run into this very issue. I am a developer and I'm also slightly red/green color blind. I described this same process to the artist but I couldn't articulate the reason behind it. I think if I knew how to articulate it in say color theory, that I will not have such a hard time next time. Is it that the two colors have the same hue or something and the grey scale proves it?

    I know this is how they can test to see if animals are color blind or not. They train them to react to say a floor color differences. When two colors are the same essentially in grey scale, the animal acts as if there is no change in color because it looks like one shade of grey to them.

    What property of color causes it to generate a certain shade of grey in grey scale?

  4. #4
    gingham dress, army boots... silver trophy redux's Avatar
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    speaking of colour blindness, you may be interested in checking out vischeck http://www.vischeck.com/vischeck/ (there's even a free, albeit limited, plugin for photoshop available)
    re·dux (adj.): brought back; returned. used postpositively
    [latin : re-, re- + dux, leader; see duke.]
    WaSP Accessibility Task Force Member
    splintered.co.uk | photographia.co.uk | redux.deviantart.com

  5. #5
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    Another excellent on-line colorblindness filter: http://colorfilter.wickline.org/.
    Mozilla users can get right click access to this tool, the aforementioned Vischeck utility, and many other free validation and testing services through the new version of Checky: http://checky.mozdev.org/.
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  6. #6
    SitePoint Zealot theunspoken1's Avatar
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    Just my two cents -- I can recall giving it a low rating. Essentially because, all it really told me was a bunch of stuff I already knew -- Just more complex and detailed ... Woopidy-doo.
    Kyle Guilfoyle - Designer/Developer
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