SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 31 of 31
  1. #26
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So why is that Google, Apple and WalMart are using .CO for their latest web projects? Aren't they afraid of that? Don't they have attorneys working for them?
    The other thing is You being a little bit naive: " ... as there is no country in control of the domain." -> that means .COM. Officially that may be so. Unofficially its the US government who controls .COM
    And thirdly I've seen private businesses use .CO. Its already happening in Europe as well as in the US
    Technically speaking Is the government of Colombia even able to shot down .CO as a gTLD worldwide? I doubt it
    Best regard and stop worrying for no reason

  2. #27
    Mouse catcher silver trophy Stevie D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Yorkshire, UK
    Posts
    5,888
    Mentioned
    122 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sweetie View Post
    So why is that Google, Apple and WalMart are using .CO for their latest web projects? Aren't they afraid of that? Don't they have attorneys working for them?
    Google, Apple and WalMart could easily afford it if the Colombian government put the registration fee up to $000s. It wouldn't even register on their accounts, it's such a tiny amount in the context of their business. Is that the same for your small start-up business? Could you absorb a sudden additional fee of $5000/year just to keep your website going? There's a heck of a lot of business that couldn't. Why take the risk?

    And thirdly I've seen private businesses use .CO. Its already happening in Europe as well as in the US
    Technically speaking Is the government of Colombia even able to shot down .CO as a gTLD worldwide? I doubt it
    Yes, businesses are doing it. I suspect that most of them aren't aware of the risks. They've been suckered in by the promotional hype from the companies selling these domains and they haven't read the small print. Who does?!

    Yes, it's a very small risk that the Colombian government will have a change of mind and decide to sting companies across the globe for punitive rates. But it could happen, and if it does then you have two options – you can either pay whatever they ask, or you can abandon your domain name along with all your links, rankings and everything else, and start again from scratch. I wouldn't recommend either of those as a strategy for a small business, so I just don't understand why anyone would want to take that risk. Especially as a lot of people will assume that .co is a typo for .com and if someone else has registered the .com version of the same domain then you'll be losing customers to them.

  3. #28
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I feel the need to shed some light on the discussions going on here due to some misinformation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Siick26 View Post
    I'm thinking of buying a .co domain name, and just wondered if they're worth buying or not. They're quite expensive (30) per year for this one i want. I never seem to see many around.
    The problem with international domains is that their intended use is for local businesses and websites to target people in the country that owns the registry for that particular gTLD. In the case of .CO, that would be Columbia. However, some international gTLDs have broken free of their "local" usage and have been able to successfully brand their domain for generic usage worldwide. What I mean by breaking free is that they have established a usage in other countries other than their own and as a result, major search engines like Google will sometimes allow the geographic target of these domains to be changed to match the country in which the website is intended for. For example, Montenegro has the .ME domain which spell the English word ME and that has proven to be highly marketable around the world. Google allows you to change the geographic target for domains in this namespace. The same can be said for the country of Tuvalu which has marketed .TV to stand for television and has the same ability for a geographical change. Interestingly in their case, they have turned over management of their registry to Verisign (a U.S. company) to help manage domain registrations through the .TV Corporation. This is presumably why registration costs are $39 for generic domains and much, much more for premium domains.

    Quote Originally Posted by dvduval View Post
    I think yes. I seem to recall Matt Cutts saying that google treats .co like .com and there are certainly some good opportunities to get good domains that are .co still.
    What Matt Cutts means by this is that there are some international gTLDs that Google recognizes as generic due to their "alternative" meanings. As outlined above, .ME can be used to mean "me", .TV can be used to mean "television" and there are some others like .FM (FM radio stations), .AM (AM radio stations), etc. Whether or not this is the case for .CO domains is up for debate because I don't currently own any and I can't verify whether Google will allow you to change the geographical target like you can for the others I mentioned. With that said, let's say for the sake of this argument that .CO CANNOT be changed, then it's not that Google doesn't treat it like a .COM per se...what it means is that Google will usually only show .CO websites to people originating from Columbia (based on IP address). The distinction would be that .COM is generic and used worldwide and .CO is used in Columbia. Now, if the marketing ploys by the people running the .CO registry have worked, then the world may very well be adopting .CO as a generic term to mean COmpany, COrporation or something else and if that happens, Google will then allow you to geographically change locations for your .CO websites. If that hasn't happened yet, then it's sure to because like others have pointed out, .CO is starting to gain worldwide traction.

    Quote Originally Posted by TechnoBear View Post
    You can use Google Webmaster Tools to specify a geographic target, irrespective of your domain extension.
    As mentioned above, some international domains DO NOT qualify for this change. I for one know this because I own a .GY domain and it's stuck being targeted to the people of Guyana. Matt Cutts however has said that this can change, but it's on a case by case basis and it would only change if there was more demand from around the world for such domains.

    Quote Originally Posted by LiquidwebBret View Post
    Has that actually ever happened? And if it did wouldn't there be a huge out cry. I don't think the internet community as a whole would allow a country stealing a domain.
    I have to agree with fegall here. It hasn't happened yet, but it could. And while there may be a huge outcry, there's nothing anyone could do because nobody is "stealing" anything. When you register a domain, you don't OWN it...you're simply paying a lease for it. The lease cost is your annual bill. In fact, there are many factors in which a registry can cancel a domain you registered. One of which is invalid contact info! Don't be foolish to think that domains are some kind of internet real estate. What fegall said is even more important to remember when dealing with international domains. Some countries are very small and if they lack the economical ability to continue running their gTLD registries, then goodbye domains! Or worse, what happens if some crazy dictator wanted to change the rules and restrict registrations to only citizens of that country or hike the registration fees up hundreds of dollars?? The list of possibilities goes on.

    Quote Originally Posted by sweetie View Post
    The other thing is You being a little bit naive: " ... as there is no country in control of the domain." -> that means .COM. Officially that may be so. Unofficially its the US government who controls .COM
    How was he being naive? .COM does not and has never belonged to any country. Sure it was created here along with the concept of the internet in the United States, but it was always intended to be a worldwide effort. The registry responsible for managing and maintaining .COM domains is Verisign. They also take care of .NET and have partial responsibilities for .GOV, .NAME, .CC and .TV. While Verisign is an American company, it's not part of the government. More importantly, the US government has nothing to do with gTLD registries.

    Quote Originally Posted by sweetie View Post
    So why is that Google, Apple and WalMart are using .CO for their latest web projects?
    I went to Walmart.co and there's a generic Apache page there. Are you sure Walmart is using .CO for any particular purpose? In fact, the registration data has some random guy's name listed...he may not even be connected to Walmart in any way. Besides, if big companies are registering .CO domains, it's just a matter of keeping them out of the hands of trademark infringers. In the case of Google, they actually run localized servers in many countries so they may at some point want to allow residents of Columbia to have access to a Columbia-specific search engine located at Google.co. Point being, none of these reasons are good enough to argue the statement that .CO domains are the next big thing.

    In my opinion, people are registering .CO domains on the off chance that they can catch typos from people trying to get to the dot com variant. This could change however. If people start recognizing .CO domains as easily as others that already exist, then it's possible. But until then, if you tell your friends to go to example.co, they will probably say, "You mean dot com, right?"

  4. #29
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    53
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by LiquidwebBret View Post
    Has that actually ever happened? And if it did wouldn't there be a huge out cry. I don't think the internet community as a whole would allow a country stealing a domain.
    Yes. It has happened. People who claim otherwise haven't a clue about ccTLD domain issues. Sometimes the smaller countries might do a deal with a company to repurpose ccTLDs because they have some other meaning or the registration policy changes so that it moves from being a relatively open ccTLD a more restrictive ccTLD. People who had registered domains under the open policy may no longer be permitted to register domains in that ccTLD. One of the more recent examples was the .cn (China) ccTLD where CNNIC and the Chinese government changed the registration requirements. The .cn ccTLD had rivalled .de as the largest ccTLD in the world at the time (approx 14M registrations) but that might have been due to the very low cost of registration and the Olympics. When the registration policies changed some of the larger non-Chinese registrars dumped the ccTLD as an option and many people did not bother renewing due to the registration requirements for non-Chinese residents and businesses. There have been other such cases where ccTLDs were being resold based on the letters in the string relating to a state or country abbreviation. I think that .NI (Nicaragua) was being resold for a while as representing Northern Ireland but the policy changed and all those domains that were Northern Ireland registered were deleted. Countries generally adminster ccTLDs rather than ICANN so they can basically do what they want with their own ccTLD.

    Regards...jmcc
    http://www.hosterstats.com
    Domain Hosting History and Domain Statistics.
    http://www.hosterstats.com/blog
    HosterStats.com Blog - Knowledge From Numbers

  5. #30
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    53
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ledfrog View Post
    In my opinion, people are registering .CO domains on the off chance that they can catch typos from people trying to get to the dot com variant. This could change however. If people start recognizing .CO domains as easily as others that already exist, then it's possible. But until then, if you tell your friends to go to example.co, they will probably say, "You mean dot com, right?"
    Many .CO registrations are speculative in that they are registered because the .COM equivalent is valuable or because, as you say, they are registered for typo traffic. The problem with the speculative registrations is that most of them are junk. The expected type-in traffic never materialised for most of these .CO domains. Most registered .CO domains are PPC parked and undeveloped. The Overstock rebranding (to O.co) was a big mistake based on the data published. Overstock still uses its .COM domain.

    A few years ago, COInternet were publishing "usage" statistics on their ccTLD from a rather clueless consultancy that could not measure web development and usage in TLDs. (It was wrongly classifying Godaddy's PPC Landing Page for undeveloped pages as a simple redirect.) I ran a usage survey on about 600K .CO websites and the results were completely different to the rubbish that COInternet had been using. There was development in the ccTLD but it was low (Approx 11%.). More .CO websites (12%) were pointing to the primary brands in other TLDs (mainly .COM). The level of PPC parking was around 60% (from memory). The bulk of registrations in .CO are US based and it has minimal uptake in other countries. While it has a respectable 1.5 million or so registrations, it is far from being the .COM killer that some of the fanboys and fangirls expected.

    Regards...jmcc
    http://www.hosterstats.com
    Domain Hosting History and Domain Statistics.
    http://www.hosterstats.com/blog
    HosterStats.com Blog - Knowledge From Numbers

  6. #31
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    53
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sweetie View Post
    So why is that Google, Apple and WalMart are using .CO for their latest web projects? Aren't they afraid of that? Don't they have attorneys working for them?
    Each of those companies use a variety of TLDs for projects. They are not limited to just .CO.

    The other thing is You being a little bit naive: " ... as there is no country in control of the domain." -> that means .COM. Officially that may be so. Unofficially its the US government who controls .COM
    No. It is the US Department of Commerce that effectively controls the Root Zone. That's far more effective than just controlling a single TLD because most nameservers automatically query the root zone servers to find which nameservers are authoritative for a TLD. If a TLD is not in the root zone then effectively the TLD does not exist as far as the internet is concerned.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNS_root_zone

    And thirdly I've seen private businesses use .CO. Its already happening in Europe as well as in the US
    A few. A very, very, very few sites. And most of these sites will revert to their local ccTLD or .COM when they find that people just don't remember their site.

    Technically speaking Is the government of Colombia even able to shot down .CO as a gTLD worldwide? I doubt it
    Best regard and stop worrying for no reason
    Well the contract with COInternet is for twenty years, I think. But there may be provisions that allow for .CO being shut down. And if there is a regime change then the contract may have to be renegotiated.

    Regards...jmcc
    http://www.hosterstats.com
    Domain Hosting History and Domain Statistics.
    http://www.hosterstats.com/blog
    HosterStats.com Blog - Knowledge From Numbers


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •