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  1. #1
    @russellg RussellG's Avatar
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    Is there any point in learning it? To my knowledge there are already heaps of sites dedicated to javascripts. So I'm tempted not to.

    If you answer yes, can you post some tutorials?
    russell.cz.cc - coming soon (I promise!)

  2. #2
    Sports Publisher mjames's Avatar
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    Learning it couldn't hurt... it isn't always needed, but the knowledge can be helpful at times. I've used JavaScript on my sites previously.

  3. #3
    SitePoint Author Kevin Yank's Avatar
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    Knowing JavaScript definitely opens up a lot of possibilities. You'll waste less time looking for a script that does almost what you want and is almost compatible with all browsers, because you'll be able to just write a script that does exactly what you need.

    Some tutorials:

    JavaScript 101 at Sausage Island
    Thau's JavaScript Tutorial at WebMonkey
    Thau's Advanced JavaScript Tutorial at WebMonkey

    Some books:

    Instant JavaScript by Wrox Press
    JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, 3rd Ed. by O'Reilly
    Dynamic HTML: The Definitive Reference by O'Reilly
    Kevin Yank
    CTO, sitepoint.com
    I wrote: Simply JavaScript | BYO PHP/MySQL | Tech Times | Editize
    Baby’s got back—a hard back, that is: The Ultimate CSS Reference

  4. #4
    SitePoint Enthusiast swoosh's Avatar
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    Personally, I think Webmonkey is a great place to start. You'll find a good tutorial at this address. I've learned JavaScript there for quite some time, but I quit because I haven't got much time back then. I should start to learn it again soon, since I'm already at my vacation.

    Oh, you might also want to check out BrainJar.com's JavaScript tutorial. It's located at http://www.brainjar.com/js/tutorial/index.html, but I think it's not really for the beginners, we have to know some programming basics.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Guru Vincent Puglia's Avatar
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    Hi RussellG,

    If all your site consists of are simple text pages and you are willing to navigate through them with links, then no -- there is no need to learn javascript, vbScript, or any other language other than HTML. If, however, you intend to have your users interact with forms and you do not want to use up your server's resources needlessly, then javascript is the way to go.
    Another reason for learning it: you don't need to ask people to modify the cut&paste scripts you find on the web.

    The best javascript primer I have seen is at: http://htmlgoodies.earthweb.com -- it is amusing, well-written, and geared for newbies.

    Insofar as books: the O'Reilly books Kevin posted are among the best, but you had best be a reader or coder. They are not considered light reading. My first javascript book was: SAM's Javascript in 24 hours. It starts with variables and ends with a shopping cart application.

    Hope this helps
    Vinny


    Where the World Once Stood
    the blades of grass
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  6. #6
    @russellg RussellG's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies guys, maybe in between learning PHP and MySQL I'll read up on it.

    russell.cz.cc - coming soon (I promise!)

  7. #7
    Irritability Defined
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    Russell,

    From a web dev point of view, if you are going back-end (i.e. PHP/mySQL/servers/etc.) then JScript is a nice little add-on just for reference.

    However, if you are going front-end (e.g. site layout/usability, HTML/DHTML, graphic design etc.) then JavaScript becomes imperative, as nearly all web design companies will virtually demand that you have JScript in your arsenal.

    It can also inflate your eventual salary a bit too - the normal rate over here in Australia for HTML coders is around $30-35,000. Add JavaScript and you have an extra $5-20,000 on top of the $30K depending on where you go.

  8. #8
    @russellg RussellG's Avatar
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    :sigh:

    Well thanks BC, you confirmed what I was dreading someone would say

    Again, thanks for the tutorials guys.
    russell.cz.cc - coming soon (I promise!)

  9. #9
    I'm baaaaaaaaaaaaack! Fluffykins's Avatar
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    I suppose it depends on your definition of learning it.

    I've no intention of ever being an expert at JavaScript, it's just too much effort and I don't have time. True, there are lots of cut and paste sites out there, and I make use of them a fair bit.

    My approach is thus:

    Don't spend endless hours learning every little nuance (sp?) of JavaScript, instead, spend a few hours learning the basics. Know how to do simple things like alert boxes and write the date and time, and maybe understand how the document object model works. If you know the basics, you can quite easily edit existing scripts to suit you, rather than having to write them from scratch.

    Of course, if someone wants to learn lots about JavaScript and become an expert I don't in any way mean to discourage them. Advanced skills in any commonly used language equal employability.

    My approach is based on the fact that, at the moment I don't need to know it indepth. But knowing the basics comes in really handy.

    Ady
    v-technologies - Freelance Goodness.

  10. #10
    Irritability Defined
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    Russell, sorry lad, someone gotta do da hard yakka

    (I was about to say 'put the hard word', but then I realised it would be way out of context )

  11. #11
    SitePoint Guru Vincent Puglia's Avatar
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    Hi RussellG,

    A few last words (yeah, right If you are already learning PHP, javascript will be a snap (especially if you have some C/C++ and/or Java experience). The syntax and underlying premises are essentially the same. Languages fall into groups, and javascript has some impressive languages in its set Learning it to the degree where you can write simple functions, such as sumTotal(qty,price, tax) & switch2ErrMsg(errCode), should take almost no effort.

    Also, as already stated a good foundation of the DOM (document object model) will benefit you in any endeavor that involves the web. And half of javascript is in manipulating the DOM

    Vinny


    Where the World Once Stood
    the blades of grass
    cut me still


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