SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 34 of 34
  1. #26
    will code HTML for food Michel V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Corsica
    Posts
    552
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I aggree to just go kill em'. Like the leader of cuba, should just be shot. That simple.
    Now if you believe the world is only black-side & white-side of the force, then you can say it's simple.
    Here's the trap.
    Don't take politics as a game.
    [blogger: zengun] [blogware contributor: wordpress]

  2. #27
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    62
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I haven't read through all of the replies yet, so maybe someone has already raised this issue, but ....

    I am a U.S citizen with a somewhat different perspective because I have lived briefly in Israel and visited Jordan (two of the most incredible places in this world). What bothers me about some of the verbal retorhic (sp?) that followed the bombing of the Navy ship in Yemen is that certain people have been saying that we (the U.S.) will strike back and not let those responsible get away with this action while, at the same time, asking the Israelis and Palestinians to put down their weapons and talk peacefully. I think the U.S. often has a double standard. I understand that people are grieving the loss of friends and family who died in the attack on the Navy ship and I can understand the desire to strike back, both for retaliation and to make a statement that will hopefully make others think twice about doing it again. BUT, the Israelis and Palestinians are experiencing these same emotions and thoughts. There are mothers and fathers and sisters and brothers and children and friends over their who are grieving horribly. Yet we (the U.S.) say they should forget their thoughts of revenge. Don't you think that many of those people too are trying to say "Think twice before you strike us again, or you'll be sorry" in an effort to assert themselves and protect their still living? I pray that the peace process will pick up again, that the people living in Israel - both Palestinian and Israeli WILL be able to put aside thier anger and fear to work towards peace, but I wish the U.S. would exercise more of what it preaches. I am not saying that terrorism or acts of war should not be addressed, and even sometimes with force, although I prefer other means to be tried first. But if we (the U.S.) go and attack, we may be feeding right into the hands of the group who bombed the ship. I think this is the "political gain" that someone said the group lacked. There are groups who would like nothing better than to draw us into an armed conflict, to make us the enemy. I can think of a hundred scenarios where certain groups might view involving the U.S. as a "political gain".

    On another note, although I personally think that oil and economics UNFORTUNATELY do play a large part in certain U.S. actions, should the U.S. unilaterally (sp?) pull out of the region? Now there is a question. What about the E.U. countries? Am I mistaken to believe that the U.S. is the only foreign presence in the region?

    I would be curious to hear what people living in the Middle East region are thinking right now about the whole situation and about foreign involvement in the region.

  3. #28
    SitePoint Wizard Anat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    1,281
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi everyone,

    This is my first post on this forum. I just came here to check it out. Funny I should start posting on this thread..

    Anyway, Shahar asked for responses from people in the Middle East, so I thought I'd give you one as I live in Israel, Tel Aviv.

    I think that the issue of terrorism is culture dependant. What is considered an act of terrorism, what makes a someone a terrorist or a freedom fighter and what are effective methods of dealing with terrorism depend on the specific conflict we're talking about.

    I understand that Islamic terrorism, specifically bin Laden, is blamed for the attack. Frankly this kind of terrorism baffles me and I really don't know what you can do about it other than fight back.

    I think there's a difference between a fight with an Arab nation, or even an Arab political terrorist group and this kind of religous "Holy War".

    I think that political resistant movements, that set as their goal an acceptable situation should be negotiated with in an attempt to stop the violence. During the past few years we have been doing just that with the PLO. Assuming that the majority of Palestinians represented by Arafat, want to establish their own sovereign state alongside Israel, there was a point in talking. Even if some Israelis didn't like the Palestinian claims at least there was something to negotiate. It looked we were getting somewhere too.

    Shahar mentioned that people are motivated by feelings and that these feelings are hard to overcome and that's all true. But I believe that there is a rational majority of people on both sides that are willing to compromise their national aspirations in order to reach a settlement.

    Whether these people come through or whether anti-peace propaganda will win - I don't know.

    I was optimistic until 2 weeks ago. Strange, isn't it, how things can deteriorate so fast...

    Anat.

  4. #29
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Lancaster, Ca. USA
    Posts
    12,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by Anat
    Hi everyone,
    I understand that Islamic terrorism, specifically bin Laden, is blamed for the attack.
    Actually the official U.S. position on the attack is:

    Barbara Bodine U.S. Ambassador to Yemen:
    It is clearly an external attack, and most probably a terrorist attack. This is going to be a question of fact. Exactly who is behind it, what their motivations were and how they were able to arrange [it] we can only speculate on.

    They don't know who did it, what the explosives where and why it was done. Labeling any one group or faction is pure speculation at this time. Due to the amount of destruction done to the craft carrying the bomb it will be a long time if ever before any of these questions are answered.
    Wayne Luke
    ------------


  5. #30
    Follow Me On Twitter: @djg gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy Dan Grossman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Philadephia, PA
    Posts
    20,580
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Whoever said oil isn't a big deal and we would just find other ways to make power:

    Hey! We use oil for heat over in my house! Not to mention, we can't afford to replace our oil heater right now.. money's a little tight.. oil's not going anywhere here ;o

  6. #31
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Lancaster, Ca. USA
    Posts
    12,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by WebDevPortal
    Whoever said oil isn't a big deal and we would just find other ways to make power:

    Hey! We use oil for heat over in my house! Not to mention, we can't afford to replace our oil heater right now.. money's a little tight.. oil's not going anywhere here ;o
    I did not say that oil wasn't a big deal. I said as a nation we should eliminate our dependence on foreign oil. By utilizing cleaner alternative energy sources, we can decrease our bills and reliance on foreign nations at the same time.

    In San Diego county (California U.S.), electric bills have doubled and tripled lately because of two reasons, deregulation and rising oil costs. Where I live in Northern Los Angeles County, our electric prices have not risen this summer. Still live in a deregulated state and still have to deal with rising oil costs, so why haven't my bills increased like my neighbors to the south?

    Our major energy supplier is Enron. About 30-45 miles to the north of me there is a "Wind Farm", 15,000 windmills that generate 5,000 kilowatt hours each. Those windmills basically subsidize my rates with free energy. 60 miles east of me is a solar energy plant doing the same thing. Neither pollute the air or water yet provide nice affordable power. The look a lot more appealing than coal or oil burning power generators as well.

    Geothermal energy can heat and cool homes for pennies a day, shouldn't this be something that is pursued?

    Hundreds of millions of gallons of water are let out of reservoirs a year, power that could be harness for electricity with minimal effects on life downstream.

    Electric-Hybrid and Hydrogen FuelCell powered engines are available and could reduce the price of car ownership by hundreds of dollars a year, yet are less destructive to your environment.

    Maybe if people like yourself looked at the big picture and thought long term, we could make our country better and stronger without reliance on the whims of foreign powers.

    Never once did I say people should suffer while we make the transition. We can produce enough energy to stand on our own, it is time we proved this to the world.
    Wayne Luke
    ------------


  7. #32
    Carpe Chicken Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    1,220
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by W. Luke
    Hundreds of millions of gallons of water are let out of reservoirs a year, power that could be harness for electricity with minimal effects on life downstream.

    Electric-Hybrid and Hydrogen FuelCell powered engines are available and could reduce the price of car ownership by hundreds of dollars a year, yet are less destructive to your environment.
    There are a few problems here. One, Hydro power has a tremendous effect on the area. We've figured this out and are now tearing down dams. Notice how many hydro plants have been built lately?

    As for Electric-Hybrid and Hydrogen FuelCell vehicles- ever read up on the price of those suckers? It is hard to convince someone to shell out more money than a new Porsche, when they'll get a car that a Hyundai could outperform. I've read that mass production of these cells (what you'd think would result in lower costs), would only result in many expensive batteries. I think the technology isn't quite here yet, though maybe not enough is being done to create the technology either.

    Wind power is a wonderful idea, but are terribly inefficient. A neighbor in my town got a grant to build a power generating windmill. It was fully funded by Uncle Sam. Not bad eh? It was so efficient and generated so much power that they took it down.

    Solar power is also a great idea, in theory, until you realize that it costs more to pump the water up to the panels. They just removed them from my apartment complex.

    Nuclear power is good (my father is actually works for the Nuclear division of Westinghouse), but it isn't perfect as I'm sure you know. All this comes down to cost, and this is what it's really all about.

    Unfortunately, oil is one of the cheaper fuel sources.
    HostHideout.com - Where professionals discuss web hosting.
    Chicken

  8. #33
    SitePoint Addict jamesglewisf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Big D
    Posts
    321
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hello again, Anat.

    I'm happy to see you joining this forum also. I enjoyed your post in this thread. You seem to have a lot of insight and a very balanced view of the situation.

    Be sure to check out the great webmaster resources at SitePoint. I think you'll find them very helpful.

    For those who don't know, Anat is a webmaster (webmistress).
    Jim Lewis
    To BE or Not to BE, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Barium Enema
    FrappyDoo Forums

  9. #34
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    62
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Boy, this thread has covered a lot of ground. Thanks to Anat for the reply and reminding us that there are still people who want and hope for peace over there. I just heard that there was an agreement to stop the current violence. I hope that it can be implemented effectively, efficiently and soon.

    Thanks also to W. Luke for the current info as to what we do and do not know about the attack in Yemen. I sincerely hope that IF the U.S. decides to take action in this situation, they will wait to be sure they know who did it AND that any action is very targeted. To get back to the original topic, I guess that is my biggest problem with the rhetoric that surfaces after a "terrorist" attack. Words can be very powerful, especially when emotions are running high. Its easy to jump to conclusions, take action and make apologies later. And to associate the actions of small groups with larger populations. Even if we don't actually take any forceful action, the rhetoric can contribute to hatred and prejudices which create long term problems. To act in haste is NOT the way I want my government to react to terrorism, whether it is a hastily jumped to opinion that is publicly expressed before the facts are available or actual use of force.

    As to renewable energy, I agree that the U.S. should become more self-reliant. As was said, that doesn't mean that oil is not important. But if we could gradually reduce our dependence . . . . I agree that we need to be realistic about renewable sources, and that there are some issues when it comes to hydroelectric power, but there are ways renewable energy can be harnessed effectively. Wind is NOT a realistic or effective source of energy EVERYWHERE, but just because it fails in one place does not mean it fails everywhere. Keeping in mind that I am getting the following info from an environmental studies major, and it is one-sided, it is my understanding that here in Texas, the local electric provider has done its best over the last few decades to discourage individuals and new companies/groups from implementing wind and solar energy by saying they were inefficient and even dangerous. HOWEVER, they are now getting into the wind-generated energy business themselves. In fact, as a customer, you too can participate in this effort to help the environment by contributing a few extra dollars with your bill! When it was someone else doing it, it was dangerous and inefficient, now that its them, its environmentally responsible.

    Hybrid cars are expensive now, but a lot of that is due to research costs. They should come down in cost (and probably become better as well) as time goes on. Its like computers - 15 years ago you'd pay 2-3 times as much for a machine that wasn't even half as powerful as the one you own now.

    Anyone know if/how much (U.S.) government subsidies play a role in how the cost of production for various forms of energy compare? It's my understanding they play a role in how organically grown and "traditionally" grown produce prices compare, so it just makes me wonder . . . .

    Forgive my stream-of-consciousness rambling. Hope this post makes some sense. I know I threw in a lot of things without much organization.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •