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  1. #1
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    How to create the RESIZABLE LOGO?

    How do you make a logo that can be resized without losing sharpness using Photoshop/Illustrator?

    I have been playing with Illustrator recently and noticed that there are no layer effects or filters like bevel etc, so those effects might have to be done in PS.

    On the other hand it sounds like vector type is the way to go if you want to resize text down to a small size. I see v. small versions of logos around the place that are quite clear like this one:



    but after a lot of experimenting with Photoshop and Illustrator I still get logos that go to the dogs on resizing down.

    If anyone can give me a hand (even general) I'd appreciate it!

  2. #2
    SitePoint Enthusiast Novapages's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chakotha
    How do you make a logo that can be resized without losing sharpness using Photoshop/Illustrator?

    On the other hand it sounds like vector type is the way to go if you want to resize text down to a small size. I see v. small versions of logos around the place that are quite clear like this one:



    but after a lot of experimenting with Photoshop and Illustrator I still get logos that go to the dogs on resizing down.

    If anyone can give me a hand (even general) I'd appreciate it!
    OK, so you've got the resizing UP figured out but not resizing down? I haven't seen the logo you're designing, but using that symantec logo for an example, you've got to have a logo that is simple enough to look good in a small size.

    If you're applying bevels and what not that could make things look bad in small sizes. Is the bevel a part of your logo design or just an effect added to it? If its actually part of the DESIGN try using gradient shape areas to achieve the effect. Same goes for any outlines.

    If you still want to use bevels and apply effects but don't want to take the long route, maybe you could just make a "flat" version of the logo that looks good in all sizes and then apply bevels as you like to the different versions.

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    Thanks for the reply.

    I haven't necessarily got the resizing UP sorted...

    I have always just designed in Photoshop at 72dpi in size 200x65 or whatever the size of the slot on the site would be but resizing was always a dirty business.

    The present logo is

    http://www.irelandhiring.com/images/logo.jpg

    I am not too worried about bevels etc. As you say this could be handled in the best way feasible once at the desired size or left altogether if a very small image.

    Is it best to design BIG at 300dpi and use that as a master for resizing down to different sizes? And is it better to design in Illustrator and resize or Photoshop?

  4. #4
    Non-Member XX7509's Avatar
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    WOW First of all those logos are really good. I like them.

    I'm not sure if I am completely understanding what you are trying to do, but when I design logos, if there small like those I design them in a graphics program then resize them with HTML. Believe it or not it works really well for most logos. As long as you keep the same realitive size. For example a logo 150x300 should not be resized to 150x150 but would could resize it to 75x150 without much problem. Because you cut both height and width by 50% this will make sure the logo dosen't streatch one way or another.

    <IMG SRC"blah blah" WIDTH="75" HEIGHT="150">

    Not sure if this will help at all, but I tried.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Enthusiast Novapages's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chakotha
    Is it better to design in Illustrator and resize or Photoshop?
    If you have illustrator and are designing logos, you'd do best to learn to design them there. But as long as you're working with vectors only in PS you should be okay.

    As for me, if I'm designing something, I always use vector masks. When I'm done adjusting my text to my liking, I make that a shape vector mask too (unless the logo is for myself and I know I'm going to have that font, or when I may want to change the font). I design these at the default photoshop size of 5x7 at 72 dpi, because as long as you leave the images in vector format you can certainly resize bigger without any problems to speak of, and as long as the logo is simple resizing smaller is not usually a problem either.

    Never flatten the image.. to be safe I always just select all, copy merged, and then save that at filename-merged.png or whatever. You can make a flattened image smaller with a wee bit o sharpening, but if you try to go bigger it'll look bad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Novapages
    ...vector masks...copy merged....
    Thanks Novapages, plenty of new ideas to go playing with there!

  7. #7
    SitePoint Enthusiast Novapages's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chakotha
    Thanks Novapages, plenty of new ideas to go playing with there!
    You're welcome. Have fun.

  8. #8
    SitePoint Addict fdeaton's Avatar
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    You should be designing in Illustrator/Freehand and keeping the logo as simple as possible. Putting images up on the web is not the same as sending out for an offset/webpress brochure or newsletter. Keep the design to 2/3 spotcolors with absolutely no gradients. From what you said (that you design at 72ppi at whatever size) means that you use Photoshop for most of the work. Use Illustrator and SAVE ALL VECTOR INFORMATION for later use. You will eventually need it.

    1st rule of designing logos--It must look good when printed to the size of a quarter, and it must look good on a highway billboard!

  9. #9
    SitePoint Enthusiast Novapages's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fdeaton
    You should be designing in Illustrator/Freehand and keeping the logo as simple as possible. Putting images up on the web is not the same as sending out for an offset/webpress brochure or newsletter. Keep the design to 2/3 spotcolors with absolutely no gradients. From what you said (that you design at 72ppi at whatever size) means that you use Photoshop for most of the work. Use Illustrator and SAVE ALL VECTOR INFORMATION for later use. You will eventually need it.

    1st rule of designing logos--It must look good when printed to the size of a quarter, and it must look good on a highway billboard!
    Hola,

    I'm not the original poster but you seemed to be replying to me for part of it. So I've got a quesetion. Considering I don't have illustrator and probably won't for a long time, and considering my logos go on the web or in programs, is it okay to save what I've got as a PS file keeping the vectors in place? Do .psd files import into illustrator or can I copy the vectors in? Considering I -can- resize the document to whatever size / resolution I want in PS (its not like things have to stay at 72dpi) and the vector images resize properly, I haven't been too concerned. If I had illustrator I'd certainly be designing there though as the vector tools in photoshop haven't been really easy to work with.

    Also I personally don't see a problem with using gradients and what not on a web logo as long as the 2-3 color version still looks great without them. The original poster seemed to be reffering to web logos as he / she posted symantec's web logo, which does have gradients. What do you think?


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