Thomas Greco is a web developer / graphic designer living in New York City. When Thomas isn't striving towards front­end perfection, he enjoys hanging with friends, going to concerts, and exploring through the wilderness! Have a question for Tom? You can reach him at thomasjosephgreco@yahoo.com, where he would be glad to answer anything he can!

Thomas's articles

  1. 12 JavaScript Libraries for Data Visualization

    Regardless of the industry, businesses throughout the world are relying more and more on data, specifically when in very large groups, to make assumptions about both the past and future. In addition to being collected, this data often must be converted into effective diagrams that highlight any and all necessary findings: a task that the JavaScript language has proven itself fully capable of completing. In turn, a much heavier focus is currently being placed on JavaScript as a data visualization tool; therefore, I compiled the following list of twelve JavaScript frameworks that can be extremely useful for data visualization.

    Dygraphs.js

    The Dygraphs.js library allows developers to create interactive charts using the X and Y axis to display powerful diagrams. The more data being parsed, the higher the functionality of the graph. That being said, Dygraphs was built for these visualizations to contain a multitude of views. For example, Dygraphs.js makes it capable to analyze separate portions of a data-set, such as specific months, in addition to the timeframe in its entirety. Also, the Dygraphs.js library is compatible across all major web browsers, and can responds to touch sensitivity, making it a thoroughougly solid choice as a data visualization framework.

    D3.js

    Eventually becoming the successor to Protovis.js, D3 is capable of creating stunning graphics via dynamically updating the DOM. An acronym for Data-Driven Document, D3.js makes use of chained methods when scripting visualizations, subsequently creating dynamic code that is also reusable. Due to its reliance on the DOM, D3 has been created in accordance with W3C web standards so that the library may render correctly across web browsers. Lastly, D3’s path generator function, defined as d3.svg.line(), gives developers the capability to produce a handful of SVGs by defining different paths, and their properties.

    InfoVis

    Commonly referred to as InfoVis, the JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT) also earned its stripes as a JavaScript library for data visualization. Equipped with WebGL support, InfoVis has been trusted by names like Mozilla and AlJazeera, showing its solidarity as a visualization tool. Along with the D3 framework, InfoVis also makes use of chained methods to manipulate the DOM, making it a reliable library for developers of any skill set.

    The Google Visualization API

    Hailing from the Google Developers Console (GDC), Google’s Visualization API can be called with barely any code. In addition to easy DOM modification, this Google API makes it easy for its user to easily define custom modifier functions that can then be placed into custom groups. Furthermore, this interface’s usability, matched with its support from the GDC’s open source network, place it among the top of the list of data visualization tools.