Dustin Runnells is a passionate technology enthusiast in Rochester, NY, with a special interest in Linux and social media. While juggling a full-time job as a professional programmer at a real company and being a loving husband and father of three, Dustin fills whatever time he has left tinkering on his personal projects. Dustin is MySQL Core Certified, LPI1 Certified, and a Zend Certified Engineer.

Dustin's articles

  1. Keeping Secrets Safe with GnuPG

    Sometimes you need information to be secure, not only while it is in transit, but also where it is stored and all layers in between. A good option might be GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG), a form of public key cryptography based on the OpenPGP standard. This article will show you how to perform a few essential tasks with GnuPG using PHP and the GnuPG PECL extension.

  2. PHPMaster: Understanding OAuth – Tweeting from Scratch, Part 2

    Welcome back to Understanding OAuth – Tweeting from Scratch. This is Part 2 of the two-part series and picks up right where we left off in Part 1 with your returned Access Credentials. Since obtaining the credentials is the grueling part of the process, there’s not much more left to do except posting a tweet on the user’s behalf. Hopefully you’ll find the final steps to be a lot easier to follow and more fun to implement.

  3. Understanding OAuth – Tweeting from Scratch, Part 2

    This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series Understanding OAuth - Tweeting from Scratch

    This is Part 2 of a two-part series with the goal of providing you with a better understanding of how OAuth v1 work by demonstrating how to connect your PHP application with OAuth to the Twitter API to post a tweet on behalf of a user. Obtaining the necessary Access Credentials was done in Part 1, so now it’s time for the fun stuff… actually posting the tweet!

  4. PHPMaster: Understanding OAuth – Tweeting from Scratch, Part 1

    A common complaint about OAuth is that it is very difficult to understand, but perhaps some of that confusion is because of an expectation that the abstraction provided by a third-party library will erase the need to understand the steps of an OAuth transaction – it does not. This two-part article demonstrates how how OAuth v1 works by explaining the process of connecting a PHP application to the Twitter API using only a few built-in functions to post a message to a user’s Twitter stream. The example code provided in this article is intended for educational purposes only. It lacks much practical use and error handling, Any real development should take advantage of an existing OAuth library, but after reading this article you’ll have a better understanding of how OAuth works and will be better equipped to troubleshoot any problems that may arise.

  5. Understanding OAuth – Tweeting from Scratch, Part 1

    This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Understanding OAuth - Tweeting from Scratch

    This is Part 1 of a two-part series that demonstrates how OAuth v1 works by explaining the process of connecting a PHP application to the Twitter API using only a few built-in functions to post a tweet. Any real development would take advantage of an existing OAuth library, but using a third-party library doesn’t erase the need to understand the steps of an OAuth transaction. After you’ve read this series you’ll have a better understanding of how OAuth works and will be better equipped to troubleshoot any problems that may arise.