Callum Hopkins is a designer and front-end developer with over 6 years web experience and a Bachelors degree in Design for Digital Media. With knowledge in both design and development, he is able to influence both sides of the web building process. Callum has a love for complex coding functions and beautiful design. He runs his own personal blog at where he writes thought-provoking articles.

Callum's articles

  1. The MVC Pattern and PHP, Part 2

    This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series The MVC Pattern and PHP

    The MVC pattern is built on the basis of keeping the presentation of data separate from the methods that interact with the data, and has been adapted and is widely used by web developers due to its emphasis on separation of concerns. In second part of this two-part series on MVC, you’ll see some of the choices one must face when trying to create a true MVC application on the web.

  2. The MVC Pattern and PHP, Part 1

    This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series The MVC Pattern and PHP

    This two-part series discusses the Model-View-Control (MVC) pattern, originally formulated in the late 1970s. The architecture pattern is built on the basis of keeping the presentation of data separate from the methods that interact with the data, and has been adapted and is widely used by web developers due to its emphasis on separation of concerns. In this part, learn the basic principles of MVC and see an example of MVC in PHP.

  3. PHP Traits: Good or Bad?

    Traits have been generally accepted by the PHP development community, mainly because it’s a feature that exists in other programming languages like Java, C++, and Python. The benefits of have been widely touted, with developers giving their own two cents on how traits can serve as a replacement for OOP inheritance. But are traits a feature which will help raise the level of PHP development, or are they just a fad?

  4. PHPMaster: A Tour of PHP.INI

    Anyone who has a server using PHP has undoubtedly heard of php.ini – it’s the configuration file used to control and customize PHP’s run-time behavior. It provides a simple way to configure settings for such things as: Upload Directories Log Errors Maximum Script execution time File Upload limit … and so much more. php.ini is the first file PHP looks for when starting up, because of the importance of the configuration directives it sets. However if you make changes to your php.ini , it will requires a server reboot before the changes take effect

  5. A Tour of PHP.INI

    Anyone who has a server using PHP has undoubtedly heard of the php.ini file – it’s the configuration file used to control and customize PHP’s run-time behavior. In this article you’ll learn about some of the more important settings in it you might want to tweak.

  6. PHPMaster: A Tour of PHP.INI

    Anyone who has a server using PHP has undoubtedly heard of php.ini – it’s the configuration file used to control and customize PHP’s run-time behavior. It provides a simple way to configure settings for such things as: Upload Directories Log Errors Maximum Script execution time File Upload limit … and so much more. php.ini is the first file PHP looks for when starting up because of the importance of the configuration directives it sets.

  7. PHPMaster: PHP Sessions

    $_SESSION is a special array used to store information across the page requests a user makes during his visit to your website or web application. The most fundamental way to explain what a sessions is like is to imagine the following scenario: You are working with an application. You open it, make some changes, and then you close it. That is a session in it’s simplest form.

  8. PHP Sessions

    A session is the logical link between page requests made by the same user during his visit. In this article, Callum gives you the low down on using sessions in PHP – how to create them, how to destroy them, and how to make sure they remain secure.

  9. DesignFestival: An Introduction to Grids in Web Design

    “A two-dimensional structure made up of a series of intersecting vertical and horizontal axes used to structure content. The grid serves as an armature on which a designer can organize text and images in a rational, easy to absorb manner.” — Wikipedia The grid is an invisible structure that collects all the elements within a web page together. Grids are never properly visible, however traces of the grids’ “discipline” can be seen by the placement of elements within a web page. The grid also dictates the size of such design elements as widths of column texts, repeated placement of elements, padding around imagery, word spacing, line height, etc

  10. DesignFestival: An Introduction to Grids in Web Design

    “A two-dimensional structure made up of a series of intersecting vertical and horizontal axes used to structure content. The grid serves as an armature on which a designer can organize text and images in a rational, easy to absorb manner.” — Wikipedia The grid is an invisible structure that collects all the elements within a web page together. Grids are never properly visible, however traces of the grids’ “discipline” can be seen by the placement of elements within a web page. The grid also dictates the size of such design elements as widths of column texts, repeated placement of elements, padding around imagery, word spacing, line height, etc